behaviouralism

(redirected from behaviouralists)

behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
That support, together with the help of local dog trainers and behaviouralists, enabled the decision to launch Wag & Company.
Systems analysis is part of the efforts of the behaviouralists in making the study of politics scientific.
They are found in the work of realists, liberals, institutionalists, Marxists, constructivists, behaviouralists, feminists, postmodernists, international lawyers, and almost everyone in between.
The social and cultural values, orientation, beliefs, and expectations of the society are such that formal education is not modifying the lifestyle practices that public health specialists and behaviouralists would want to change.
86) Many of the findings of behavioural studies are based on experiments with students, as a result of which Posner argues that the empirical evidence for the claim of the behaviouralists is weaker than is often held.
Similarly, the behaviouralists in their self-conceit have attempted to eschew or abstain from 'ought' questions and try to jettison value judgments, since they are much concerned with the 'is' or empirical questions.
Key words: political-studies, value-free, value-laden, political-philosophy, behaviouralist, international relations, social sciences
The second was essentially defined by the polemic engagement of Hedley Bull, probably the most prominent among the English School scholars, in the debate between traditionalists and behaviouralists.
The chapters in the book uncover some disputes among the scientific community related to long and short term feed intake regulation in swine, driven by renowned geneticists, nutritionists, physiologists, endocrinologists and behaviouralists.
Behaviouralists in the group explain the decline as related to the success of capitalism.
While managerialists note the efficiency to be gained (Belt, Richardson and Webster, 2002), behaviouralists such as Taylor and Bain (1999) liken the labour process to 'white collar' production lines.
As elsewhere in the social sciences, the behaviouralists argued for a more scientific approach; foreign policy should be quantifiable and predictable.