behaviouralism

(redirected from behaviouralists)

behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
More broadly, the award of the 2017 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel to Richard Thaler for his contributions to behavioural economics continues popular recognition--following Herbert Simon (1978), Daniel Kahneman (2002) and Robert Shiller (2013)--for the contribution of behaviouralists to enriching mainstream economics.
That support, together with the help of local dog trainers and behaviouralists, enabled the decision to launch Wag & Company.
Systems analysis is part of the efforts of the behaviouralists in making the study of politics scientific.
Flying, in this case, meant going off "into the exotic realms inhabited by modern day organizational theorists and administrative behaviouralists" (1973: xii).
The social and cultural values, orientation, beliefs, and expectations of the society are such that formal education is not modifying the lifestyle practices that public health specialists and behaviouralists would want to change.
(86) Many of the findings of behavioural studies are based on experiments with students, as a result of which Posner argues that the empirical evidence for the claim of the behaviouralists is weaker than is often held.
Similarly, the behaviouralists in their self-conceit have attempted to eschew or abstain from 'ought' questions and try to jettison value judgments, since they are much concerned with the 'is' or empirical questions.
The second was essentially defined by the polemic engagement of Hedley Bull, probably the most prominent among the English School scholars, in the debate between traditionalists and behaviouralists. Regarding pluralism, critics have often dismissed the approach of the English School as non-scientific and they have charged it with inconclusiveness and vagueness.
The chapters in the book uncover some disputes among the scientific community related to long and short term feed intake regulation in swine, driven by renowned geneticists, nutritionists, physiologists, endocrinologists and behaviouralists. Overall the book offers the current knowledge on how animal physiology orchestrates feed intake in pigs.
Structuralists in this interpretive school attribute the decline in union density to slower economic growth rates and rising unemployment (workers can no longer afford union membership), to the demise of heavy industries and the rise of the service sector (it is more difficult to form and maintain unions in service industries), or to "expanded foreign trade which has undermined the bargaining position of many unions." Behaviouralists in the group explain the decline as related to the success of capitalism.
The second view we refer to as the behaviouralist perspective, a framework that focuses on the human costs of work processes in call centres (Taylor and Bain, 1999).