glue

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adhesive

adhesive, substance capable of sticking to surfaces of other substances and bonding them to one another. The term adhesive cement is sometimes used in place of adhesive, especially when referring to a synthetic adhesive. Animal glue, a gelatin made from hides, hooves, or bones, was probably known in prehistoric times; it remained the leading adhesive until the 20th cent. It is now used especially in cabinetmaking. Animal glue is sold both as a solid (either ground or in sheets, to be melted in a water-jacketed glue pot and applied while hot) and as liquid glue (an acidic solution). Adhesives from vegetable sources are also important; they include natural gums and resins, mucilage, and starch and starch derivatives. They are commonly used for sizing paper and textiles and for labeling, sealing, and manufacturing paper goods. Other adhesives derived from animal and vegetable sources include blood glue, casein glue, fish glue, rubber adhesives, and cellulose derivatives. Adhesives having special properties are prepared from synthetic resins. Some synthetic adhesives, such as the epoxy resins, are strong enough to be used in construction in place of welding or riveting. Adhesive tapes have a coating of pressure-sensitive adhesive.

Bibliography

See I. Skeist, ed., Handbook of Adhesives (1962); N. A. de Bruyne and R. Houwink, ed., Adhesion and Adhesives (2 vol., 2d ed. 1965–67); A. J. Kinloch, Adhesion and Adhesives: Science and Technology (1987).

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Glue

An adhesive substance; types include liquid glue, casein glue, animal glue, epoxy resin, vegetable glue, synthetic resin, cellulose cement and rubber compounds.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

glue

[glü]
(materials)
A crude, impure, amber-colored form of commercial gelatin of unknown detailed composition produced by the hydrolysis of animal collagen; gelatinizes in aqueous solutions and dries to form a strong, adhesive layer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

glue

Any fluid adhesive substance used for joining materials, often of substantial weight; generally refers to adhesives that cure without heat: animal glue, fish glue, emulsion glue, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

glue

any natural or synthetic adhesive, esp a sticky gelatinous substance prepared by boiling animal products such as bones, skin, and horns
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glue

(jargon)
A generic term for any interface logic or protocol that connects two component blocks. For example, Blue Glue is IBM's SNA protocol, and hardware designers call anything used to connect large VLSI's or circuit blocks "glue logic".
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

glue

Software that provides some conversion, translation or other process that makes one system work with another. For example, an application adapter reformats the data into a form available to another application and vice versa. A CGI script sits between the browser and the database, enabling search requests to be passed to the database. "Glue" or "glue software" are terms that can be widely used to reference small programs or scripts needed to integrate applications or tie subsystems together. See application integration, integration server and middleware. See also glue chip.
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