bell-shaped curve


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bell-shaped curve

[¦bel ¦shāpt ′kərv]
(statistics)
The curve representing a continuous frequency distribution with a shape having the overall curvature of the vertical cross section of a bell; usually applied to the normal distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Now that we know the bell-shaped curve isn't always the right way to think about a particular problem, process, or operation, we can begin to design around it, and maybe take advantage of it," Granick said.
If the bell-shaped curve held true, the bulk of coffee would fall into the average, or mediocre category, with a very small percentage of "bad ccoffee" at the bottom of scale.
In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Hubbert used a simple bell-shaped curve to forecast the annual rate of production in the lower 48 U.S.
My notes showed that tests such as these are "norm-referenced," designed so that the distribution of tests scores will reflect a bell-shaped curve. Such a test has numerous interference techniques, such as questions about above-grade level material never presented to students, multiple choice questions, and inadequate time to answer questions.
For outpatients with bipolar depression, "I would probably shoot for 200-300 mg/day," but remember that proper dosing follows a bell-shaped curve, he said.
Diversity can often be represented by a bell-shaped curve of frequencies verses the extent of progressive views.
Considerable research has supported the existence of the classic bell-shaped curve, mostly based on food products and fast-moving consumer goods such as pop records and fashion clothing.
In other words, as reflected by a "normal" bell-shaped curve, the higher costs associated with some patients will be offset by the lower costs of others.
Antibody-dependent enhancement in FIPV demonstrates a bell-shaped curve with increasing dilutions; maximal enhancement occurs at subneutralizing titers (34).
"The average age of menopause is 51 years, and [bone mineral density] at that age follows a bell-shaped curve of distribution.
It is the familiar bell-shaped curve. However, not every bell-shaped curve is a normal distribution.
Since norm-referenced test scores are based on a bell-shaped curve, 50% of the students who take the test fall below average and 50% fall above.