belles-lettres


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belles-lettres

(bĕl-lĕ`trə) [from the French for literature, literally "fine letters"], literature that is appreciated for the beauty, artistry, and originality of its style and tone rather than for its ideas and informational content. Earlier the term was synonymous with literature, referring particularly to fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, and essays. However, belletristic literature has come to mean light, artificial writing and essays extolling the beauties of literature.

belles-lettres

literary works, esp essays and poetry, valued for their aesthetic rather than their informative or moral content
References in periodicals archive ?
El respaldo de la monarquia, que habia salvado a la universidad en uno de sus momentos mas criticos, fue muy celebrado y produjo numerosas muestras publicas de agradecimiento, entre ellas un Discurso de Rollin (1719), preludio de su famoso tratado educativo, De la maniere d'enseigner et d'etudier les Belles-Lettres par rapport a l'esprit et au coeur (1726-1728).
Et en 1972, Vargas Llosa collabore meme avec Marti de Riquer--associe etranger de l'Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres...
The Prix Honor Chave is a prestigious prize awarded by the Acadmie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, a French learned society dedicated to the humanities.
In the essays dealing with the medieval and modern periods, "literature" here mainly means belles-lettres, and thus many significant halakhic, philosophical, exegetical, and mystical texts are ignored.
The conferences, inaugurated in 1968, bring to the OU campus major literary figures from around the world for two weeks of lectures, seminars, readings, and symposia, introducing the entire University community to such "living classics" of international belles-lettres as Jorge Luis Borges, Maryse Conde Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, Edouard Glissant, Czeslaw Milosz, Octavio Paz, and Mario Vargas Llosa.
Both these books are available from the superbly discerning mail-order outfit A Common Reader,(1) whose catalogs make better reading than most publishers' lists and whose spirit of genial belles-lettres is substantially the same one exemplified by those two dear fossils, George Lyttleton and Rupert Hart-Davis.
Meikle, `The Chair of Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres in the University of Edinburgh', University of Edinburgh Journal, 13 (1944-5), 96-7.
The specter of immiserated workers mindlessly transcribing belles-lettres is further raised by netLibrary, an up-and-coming business that sells digital books to libraries.
How did poetry and belles-lettres evolve between the fifth and the 16th centuries?
The fourteen chapters are arranged chronologically, but unified largely according to topics (religion, politics, science) or genres (poetry, history, belles-lettres).
This rather tedious deposition has, as the editor admits, 'the air of an official document rather than an item of belles-lettres' (p.
Hibbert smoothes out all the difficulties and writes in the belles-lettres tradition that lights up the lively contemporary quotation with a kind of poetic license (|[The queen's] first baby died within an hour of its christening; but the mother soon recovered and her husband was so kind and considerate that she felt not only "the happiest princess", but "the happiest woman in the world".