belles-lettres


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belles-lettres

(bĕl-lĕ`trə) [from the French for literature, literally "fine letters"], literature that is appreciated for the beauty, artistry, and originality of its style and tone rather than for its ideas and informational content. Earlier the term was synonymous with literature, referring particularly to fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, and essays. However, belletristic literature has come to mean light, artificial writing and essays extolling the beauties of literature.

belles-lettres

literary works, esp essays and poetry, valued for their aesthetic rather than their informative or moral content
References in periodicals archive ?
46) Lauer presented this material to the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres on June 1, 1900 and published his findings in "Les Fouilles du Sancta Sanctorum au Latran," Melanges d 'archeologie et d 'histoire 20 (1900): 251 87.
Paper presented at the Meeting of l'Academie des Sciences, Belles-Lettres et Arts de Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France), 4 June 1863.
After establishing the classical and proximate historical contexts for Smith's thought, McKenna turns to the Lectures in Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres.
Freret, Nicolas (1850), "Observations generales sur la geographie ancienne", in Memories De L'Institut National De France Academie Des Inscriptions Et Belles-Lettres, pp.
Their work at Aberystwyth University has now been recognised with the Prix Honor Chave, a prestigious honour awarded by the French learned society the Acadmie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres de l'Institut de France.
He does an excellent job of sketching the sexual categories that did exist, drawing from a dazzling variety of sources--everything from medical and legal treatises to poetry and belles-lettres to juicy biographical and polemical works.
Both these books are available from the superbly discerning mail-order outfit A Common Reader,(1) whose catalogs make better reading than most publishers' lists and whose spirit of genial belles-lettres is substantially the same one exemplified by those two dear fossils, George Lyttleton and Rupert Hart-Davis.
The conferences, inaugurated in 1968, bring to the OU campus major literary figures from around the world for two weeks of lectures, seminars, readings, and symposia, introducing the entire University community to such "living classics" of international belles-lettres as Jorge Luis Borges, Maryse Conde Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, Edouard Glissant, Czeslaw Milosz, Octavio Paz, and Mario Vargas Llosa.
Lewis' modern belles-lettres contribution, or sixteenth-century Protestant England?
How did poetry and belles-lettres evolve between the fifth and the 16th centuries?
In The Words, Sartre's autobiography of his early years, he explained his literary career: "Removed from Catholicism, the sacred was deposited in belles-lettres and the penman appeared, an ersatz of the Christian I was unable to be, my sole concern was salvation.