belles-lettres

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belles-lettres

(bĕl-lĕ`trə) [from the French for literature, literally "fine letters"], literature that is appreciated for the beauty, artistry, and originality of its style and tone rather than for its ideas and informational content. Earlier the term was synonymous with literature, referring particularly to fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, and essays. However, belletristic literature has come to mean light, artificial writing and essays extolling the beauties of literature.
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belles-lettres

literary works, esp essays and poetry, valued for their aesthetic rather than their informative or moral content
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas Theory spoke to a professionalist, specialized audience, the new belletrism beckons to a more general, public audience.
The new belletrism responds to yet a different need, and to a new historical conjuncture, of the massive decline of funding for public programs in general (the welfare state) and to universities in particular.
The new belletrism also provides a renewed teaching rationale that reinvokes the language of pleasure and appreciation suitable for undergraduate rather than graduate courses.
[33] Now, however, the new belletrism represents the readoption of a belletristic manner and address to a general audience, fused with academic discourse, promising to repair the current public image of the academic critic by dispelling the image of expertise run amok to obscure overspecialization and professional self-interest.
The shift to the new belletrism, then, reconfigures the image of the academic literary critic from that of a specialist scholar emulating the social or hard sciences, and the literature faculty engaged in an intra-university competition with the social sciences, to a person of letters emulating highbrow journalism.
The story of those in the latter gerneration is one of a naturalized new belletrism, that of a posttheory generation assuming the backdrop of Theory and cultural studies but deliberately aiming to address and impact a public culture, in journalistic as well as academic venues, and stretching academic venues to encom pass more journalized, publicly relevant forms.
(10.) To my knowledge, I am the first to label it as a "new belletrism," and organized an MLA panel in 1994 to account for the different strands I distinguish here.
(19.) I see the new belletrism as more directly adopting the mantle of Literature, whereas I see cultural studies as a medial moment that exhibits the language and conceptual base of theory, but does so in diffuse ways.
Now it seems that, instead of theory, the new belletrism has taken the position of forming the young, or at least literary professionals, replacing precisely those "spiritual" values deprived through the death of religion.
"Cultural Studies and the New Belletrism: Strange Anti-Allies for Public Discourse." Rhetoric in the Vortex of Cultural Studies.