bench press

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bench press

a weight-training exercise in which a person lies on a bench and pushes a barbell upwards with both hands from chest level until the arms are straight, then lowers it again
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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For bench presses, go 7 times up a quarter from the chest; press to full extension, lower the bar a quarter 7 times; then finish with 7 regular bench presses.
Employ this technique with bench presses (5 seconds lowering bar to chest and 10 seconds pressing the bar to full extension).
Squats and bench presses are multi-joint exercises, affecting more muscles per movement.
Instead of bench presses, try 21s with pushups--bringing a new dimension to this body weight-only exercise!
You, too, must "throw curves" at your muscles by often changing rep speeds or "throwing a change-up" by starting 1 session with squats, next workout with bench presses, and next with rows.
Performing just 3 multi-joint exercises--squats, bench presses, and rows--and doing 3 sets per exercise (9 total sets the whole workout) should take only 20 minutes.
Do a set of super slow bench presses or pushups followed immediately (super set) with bent-over rows in super slow fashion.
While bench presses or pushups target the chest, deltoids and triceps, rows, pulldowns or chinups build opposite muscle groups (back, biceps)--training multiple muscle groups in less time time!
A typical compound set for pectoral muscles might be bench presses immediately followed with dumbbell flys, chair or bar dips, and concluding with incline dumbbell presses--a truly massive set comprising 4 nonstop exercises.
For the chest, by doing single-joint flys followed quickly with either multi-joint bench presses or pushups, you are performing the "Pre-Exhaust System." Robert Kennedy says that he likes to use the pre-exhaust principle on one body part at a time to 'jolt' the muscles into new growth.
For instance, bench presses indirectly work chest muscles because the triceps and deltoids are also involved in the lift and are known as the "weak links," according to Kennedy.
They should vary the sequence of exercise, starting with bench presses one day and with squats the next day.