bend sinister


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bend sinister

supposed stigma of illegitimate birth. [Heraldry: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
A similar extradiegetic power emerges at the end of Nabokov's powerful tirade against fascist dictatorship in Bend Sinister (1972).
However, assuming he was not being coy with his interviewer, his first introduction to Sterne would roughly coincide with the decade during which he composed Real Life of Sebastian Knight, Nikolai Gogol, and Bend Sinister. While the apparent parallels between Nabokov and Sterne have gone largely unacknowledged, in a 1960 review of Bend Sinister, Frank Kermode points to Sterne and specifically to Tristram Shandy as a literary precursor to Nabokov's Bend Sinister, going as far as to describe Nabokov's protagonist, Adam Krug, as a "tragic Shandy" (75).
In Ojibwa, an Algonquian Indian dialect, the town name "Winnipeg" (in Bend Sinister) indicates "filthy stream," affording justification for the preponderance of lighthearted punning in matters pertaining to bodily functions in Finnegans Wake.
Walter looks at the duality of ideological opposition in Bend Sinister, Galina Rylkova delineates trances of Kuzmin in The Eye (but, surprisingly, does not give a full account of the issues of Silver Age culture and homosexuality in Nabokov's writing), and David Larmour examines the theme of sports in Glory, noticing through it the protagonist's ambiguous gender identity yet at the same time ignoring the much more clearly ambiguous issue of the protagonist's mixed origins, a question crucial to a novel that ends with a pseudo-patriotic return to Russia.
Brian Walter also examines Nabokov's derision of the "Literature of Ideas" (25) in "Two Organ-Grinders: Duality and Discontent in Bend Sinister." He explores what he labels as the "odd" (25) position of Bend Sinister in Nabokov's literary oeuvre and attributes it largely to the author's discomfort with writing political novels.
Three new volumes are devoted to Vladimir Nabakov: Novels and Memoirs 1941-1951 (which includes The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, Bend Sinister, and Speak Memory, 710 pages, $35.00); Novels 1955-1962 (Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Lolita: A Screenplay, 904 pages, $35.00), and Novels 1969-1974 (Ada, Transparent Things, Look at the Harlequins, 824 pages, $35.00).
His first novels in English, Real Life of Sebastian Knight,The (1941) and Bend Sinister (1947), do not rank with his best Russian work, but Pale Fire (1962) extends and completes Nabokov's mastery of unorthodox structure, first shown in The Gift.