ratio

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ratio.

The ratio of two quantities expressed in terms of the same unit is the fraction that has the first quantity as numerator and the second as denominator. For example, if in a group of 100 people 5 die, the ratio of deaths to the total number in the group is 5/100=1/20=.05. Ratios are indicated also by writing the two values with a colon between them, e.g., the ratio of 4 to 8 can be expressed by 4:8 as well as by 4/8.
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Ratio

A relationship in magnitude, quantity, or degree between two or more similar things.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ratio

 

The ratio of two numbers is the quotient from the division of the first number, by the second. The ratio of two homogeneous magnitudes is the number obtained by measuring the first magnitude when the second is chosen as the unit of measurement. If two magnitudes are measured in the same unit of measurement, their ratio is equal to that of the numbers that measure them.

The ratio of the lengths of two segments may be expressed by a rational or irrational number. In the former case the segments are said to be commensurable, and in the latter incommensurable. Mathematicians of the ancient world had no knowledge of irrational numbers. For them the concept of the ratio of two segments did not reduce to the concept of number. In their conception the geometrical theory of the ratios of magnitudes was not connected with the concept of number and played an independent role. In a sense, it substituted for a theory of real numbers. Indeed, according to Euclid the four segments, a, b, a’, and b’ form the proportion a: b = a’:b’ if for any natural numbers m and n one of the relations ma = nb, ma > nb, ma < nb is satisfied simultaneously with the corresponding relation ma’ = nb’, ma’> nb’, or ma’ < nb’. It follows that when a and b are incommensurable the subdivision of the rational numbers (x = m/n) into two classes according to whether a > xb or a < xb coincides with the subdivision according to whether a’ > xb’ or a’ < xb’ —this is the idea behind the modern theory of Dedekind cuts.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ratio

[′rā·shō]
(mathematics)
A ratio of two quantities or mathematical objects A and B is their quotient or fraction A / B.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ratio

Maths a quotient of two numbers or quantities
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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2004), holds that pesticide testing on human subjects can be conducted, but only under the most stringent scientific and ethical standards, such as favorable benefit-risk ratios, informed consent, equitable subject selection, risk minimization, valid study design, and scientific necessity.
In IRIS we see a clear benefit-risk ratio. By prescribing pioglitazone, there is significant cardiovascular risk Improvement, while the number of cancer cases was quite small.
Because extended use of estrogen-progestin HT increases the risk of breast cancer, estrogen-only HT has a more favorable benefit-risk ratio. If a patient uses estrogen-progestin HT for an extended duration, periodic discussions about the elevated risk of breast cancer are appropriate.
EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) is reviewing all data linked to the cardiovascular and cutaneous safety concerns, focusing on existing risk-minimisation measures and their effect on the benefit-risk ratio of Protelos and Osseor.