benzimidazole


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benzimidazole

[‚ben·zə′mid·ə‚zȯl]
(organic chemistry)
C7H6N2 Colorless crystals; melting point 170°C; slightly soluble in water, soluble in ethanol; used in organic synthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The extrachromosomal multicopy transgenic animals became wild-type for both the ben-1 and vps-45 mutations, and were sensitive to benzimidazole but viable at 20 [degrees]C.
Azolium salts and neutral 2-aryl derivatives of benzimidazole, benzothiazole and benzoxazole were synthesized by Cetinkaya et al.
Monotherapy with benzimidazole derivatives is recommended in patients with inoperable hepatic and pulmonary CE, cysts in multiple organs, or cysts smaller than 5 cm in dimeter.
The use of benzimidazoles, a group of organic fungicides with systemic action started in the 1960s, became a milestone in the history of the development of fungicides.
It is capable of absorbing higher amount acid as compared with PBI as it has higher concentration of benzimidazole group [8].
The inactive benzimidazole is converted to a cationic tetracyclic sulphonamide compounds which binds covalently to cysteine residues on the alpha subunit of H+/K+ ATPase enzyme molecule, thereby inhibiting acid production.
CBZ is a systemic benzimidazole fungicide, and is the main metabolite of benomyl, used to control a broad range of diseases on arable crops (cereals, oilseed rape), fruits and vegetables, and also in post-harvest food storage (Hicks, 1998).
Efficacy of benzimidazole anthelmintics in goats and sheep in the Philllipines using a larval development assay.
Carbendazim is a systemic benzimidazole fungicide that plays a very important role in plant disease control (Quian et al, 1996).
In vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of some benzimidazole derivatives against two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.