berlinite

berlinite

[′bər·lə‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
Al(PO4) A colorless to gray or pale rose, hexagonal mineral consisting of aluminum orthophosphate; occurs in massive form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Helmut Pristacz (University of Vienna, Austria, and University of Tokyo, Japan) and coauthors studied synthetic turquoise from the Natural History Museum in Vienna, Austria, and found that it had an oolitic microstructure composed of a fibrous amorphous phase (related to the high-pressure berlinite structure) together with natural turquoise (presumably used as a starting material) and synthetic turquoise.
6 Table 2: XRD analysis of coal ash mixture at different curing period Coal ash Curing period composition (%) Crystalline composition (%) 7 day 28 day BA 100 Berlinite 76.
The evidence of these metal oxides and other compounds such as gypsum, weddellite, despujolsite, quartz, berlinite, carbonate, mica, feldspar and silicate is mainly due to the biological interaction of the fungi Aspergillus, Penicillium, Alternaria, Fusarium, Mucor and Syncephalastrum found in the mortars from Bogota, Villa de Leyva and Barichara.
Irregular veinlets of white coarse-grained berlinite occur intersecting frondelite (R.
Aluminum phosphate or berlinite is a quartz analog with a somewhat larger coupling coefficient; it also has ZTCs, but present growth methods have not succeeded yet in reducing the loss to the point where it can fill a niche for bandpass filters wider than those using quartz.
First, Jeanloz and Kruger surround their crystals with a fluid to ensure even pressure distribution around the samples, in this case the berlinite form of aluminum phosphate.
1) Townsfolk in Berlin, irritated by the flocks of Berlinites migrating to Westside on weekends and holidays, resolved to build a park of their own: the town needed "something after the style of Westside park, only on a larger scale.
For Berlinites, however, eager to mimic Waterloo's success, it meant something else: a spectacular new park in the heart of town.
George Rumpel, the mayor, had written an open letter to Berlinites outlining his position on the matter: "The water works plant will not be managed by the Council.
So confident were Berlinites in the merits of special-purpose management that the town decided in 1903 to go on the offensive.