best-effort service

best-effort service

A communications service that makes no guarantees regarding the speed with which data will be transmitted to the recipient or that the data will even be delivered entirely.
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123) Potential classes of service may offer throughput, loss, delay, or jitter that is relatively better than the throughput, loss, delay, or jitter provided by best-effort service during times of congestion (124) or may provide a performance that is more constant and predictable than best-effort service.
The definition of a best-effort service with minimum QoS levels is also part of the network neutrality debate (CAVE & CROCIONI, 2011).
Although the above mentioned methods improve the efficiency of packet delivery by minimizing the handoff latency, they provide only the best-effort service offered by the parent protocol IP.
The service, named Group-Ether, is a best-effort service offering low-cost nationwide network coverage by taking advantage of broadband access lines that NTT Com's sister companies NTT East and NTT West provide with certain versions of their FLET'S-branded Internet access services.
In order to preserve the reliability and QoS for business applications, enterprises should enable the WLAN system's QoS features for critical voice, data and video applications on the corporate ESSID, while providing best-effort service for the guest ESSID.
From a service management perspective, prices provide a way to facilitate differential services so that those who need high QoS can be provided with that--this simply is not a possibility with TCP/IP's best-effort service.
Is best-effort service good enough to build a robust global data network?
A key goal would be a system that supports both the reliable delivery of scheduled, priority traffic while retaining the great economies of first-come-first-served, best-effort service for the remainder.
UBR connections receive best-effort service only and lack QoS guarantees that control transmission characteristics like cell loss and delay.
Telstra, however, does make an 8Mb/s available, but this is not a guaranteed speed, only a best-effort service.
Given the nature of best-effort service, traffic shaping is imperative to ensure that bursty LAN (local area network) traffic does not exceed the peak cell rate of 10 Mbps that is part of the SLA between Bezeq and Elite.
QoS can be achieved by explicitly reserving bandwidth on the network or by providing preferential service to selected network traffic while providing best-effort service to all other traffic.