beta carotene


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beta carotene

[′bād·ə ′kar·ə‚tēn]
(biochemistry)
C40H56 A carotenoid hydrocarbon pigment found widely in nature, always associated with chlorophylls; converted to vitamin A in the liver of many animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Beta carotene has protective role on histomorphology of kidneys in subacute APAP-induced renal damage in rats.
The data obtained for moisture content, beta carotene content and bioaccessibility were analyzed using Stata statistical software (Stata Corporation, Texas, and USA).
The investigators concluded that "an above-median intake of the combination of vitamins C and E, beta carotene, and zinc was associated with a 35 percent lower risk of incident AMD.
The findings come from the Physicians' Health Study II, a randomized trial of supplementation with beta carotene and other vitamins for chronic disease prevention in men, said Dr.
Peto R, Doll R, Buckley JD (1981) Can dietary beta carotene materially reduce human cancer rates.
The teams also measured lutein and beta carotene in each person's blood.
The researchers concluded that for healthy women beta carotene produces neither benefit nor harm for risk of cancer or cardiovascular disease.
We understand this beta carotene is available in a selection of formulations to suit individual application and process requirements.
They are especially high in beta carotene, which the body turns into vitamin A.
NEW YORK - Two studies on the efficacy and safety of beta carotene recently completed by the National Cancer Institute have touched off a vigorous debate.
It packs higher levels of beta carotene, five parts per million on average, than a regular cucumber's one ppm.
Scientists were surprised and reporters dumbfounded--or else gleeful at the prospect of shocking headlines--by the recently published results of a Finnish study on beta carotene and vitamin E.