agonist

(redirected from beta-2 agonist)
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agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers commented that this might be due to potential masking effects of salmeterol in airway inflammation in asthmatic population with LRS, i.e., by simple BDRs beta-2 agonists relieve symptoms without arresting the principal inflammation causing COPD.
Beta-2 agonists are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and another respiratory distress status.
Currently, for acute severe asthma, guideline recommendations suggest repeated use of inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonists, up to 10 puffs repeated every 10 to 20 minutes, or repeated nebulised dosing.
Previous studies showed that treatment with beta-2 agonists, in particular salbutamol, might increase the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia at high doses in asthmatics (1, 2,8).
One approach is to treat this patient with a long-acting beta-2 agonist such as salmeterol or formoterol around the clock.
The beta-2 agonist use was reduced by 95%, and the corticosteroid inhaler was reduced by 92%.
Overall, the results indicate that daily use of an inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist was associated [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, p [less than].05] with an asthma-related hospitalization when compared to the control group.
The report recommends that "regularly scheduled, short-acting inhaled beta-2 agonist treatment should be kept to a minimum." Beta-2 agonists offer relief but don't control symptoms, affect peak expiratory flow rates, or alter airway hyperresponsiveness.
The report compared the use of the newer anti-inflammatory drugs with the more conventional asthma drugs, such as theophylline and the newer bronchodilators known as beta-2 agonists. Many physicians now think the anti-inflammatory medications are more appropriate in many instances.
* Inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonists and anticholinergic bronchodilators have positive effects.
These patients generally maintain asthma control with daily use of a combination of inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta-2 agonist, and having a short-acting beta-2 agonist available for quick relief.
'Wada has conducted several studies on salbutamol and continues to conduct studies on beta-2 agonists. We believe the current threshold is solid considering the scientific literature published on salbutamol over the past 20 years.