beta-blocker

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beta-blocker

beta-blocker or beta-adrenergic blocking agent (bāˈtə ădˌrənûrˈjĭk), drug that reduces the symptoms connected with hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, migraine headaches, and other disorders related to the sympathetic nervous system. Beta-blockers also are sometimes given after heart attacks to stabilize the heartbeat. Within the sympathetic nervous system, beta-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the heart, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels. Beta-blockers compete with the nerve-stimulating hormone epinephrine for these receptor sites and thus interfere with the action of epinephrine, lowering blood pressure and heart rate, stopping arrhythmias, and preventing migraine headaches. Because it is also epinephrine that prepares the body for “fight or flight” in stressful or fearful situations, beta-blockers are sometimes used as antianxiety drugs, especially for stage fright and the like. People taking a beta-blocker must avoid caffeine, alcohol, and salty foods, because the interaction of those substances and the drug can raise the heart rate and blood pressure. Propranolol (Inderal) is a commonly used beta-blocker.
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beta-blocker

Medicine any of a class of drugs, such as propranolol, that inhibit the activity of the nerves that are stimulated by adrenaline; they therefore decrease the contraction and speed of the heart: used in the treatment of high blood pressure and angina pectoris
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Competitive adsorption exists between fluorescent dyes and analyte (Betaxolol hydrochloride).
2d, I and I0 were fluorescence intensity when Betaxolol hydrochloride was present and absent in FD/GO solution.
Kurita, Effect of betaxolol hydrochloride on heart rate variability indices during exercise stress testing in patients with hypertension, Biomed.