Scylla

(redirected from between Scylla and Charybdis)
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Scylla

(sĭl`ə), in Greek mythology. 1 Sea monster. According to one legend Circe, jealous of the sea god Glaucus' love for Scylla, changed her from a beautiful nymph into a horrible doglike creature with six heads and twelve feet; according to another, Amphitrite, jealous of Poseidon's love for her, transformed her into the ugly monster. Scylla lived on the rocks on the Italian side of the Strait of Messina, where she seized sailors from passing ships and devoured them. On the other side of the strait was the whirlpool Charybdis. Odysseus in his wanderings passed between them, as did Jason and the Argonauts. 2 Daughter of Nisus, king of Megara. She betrayed her father to his enemy Minos, but when she sought Minos' love, he scorned her.
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Scylla

half beautiful maiden, half hideous dog. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]

Scylla

and Charybdis two equally dangerous alternatives. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey, Espy, 41]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scylla

Greek myth a sea nymph transformed into a sea monster believed to drown sailors navigating the Strait of Messina. She was identified with a rock off the Italian coast
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
''When the Vietnamese communist army invaded Cambodia to 'free' us from the Khmer Rouge, we quickly realized that we were caught between Scylla and Charybdis,'' he said.
In particular, Postel notes the straits between Scylla and Charybdis (although she uses the less allusive Americanism "between a rock and a hard place") that we must navigate: the need for more irrigation to ensure adequate food production and the need for more high quality water for domestic consumption, both for the same growing population.
Perhaps it is like Odysseus foolishly facing the narrows between Scylla and Charybdis by standing in the front of his boat, dressed in armor and holding two long spears.