bicameral

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bicameral

Politics (of a legislature) consisting of two chambers

bicameral

[bī′kam·ə·rəl]
(biology)
Having two chambers, as the heart of a fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
That requirement can be served best by bicameralism which plays a very crucial role in the development of federalism by managing the issues of diversity and inequality of various types.
He insists on a diverse representation and "procedures for lawmaking" that are "elaborate and responsible" and that "incorporate various safeguards, such as bicameralism, robust committee scrutiny, and multiple levels of consideration, debate, and voting.
legal force or effect of that text outside of bicameralism and
While bicameralism is the norm for federal legislative function, some constitutional provisions for the exercise of legislative power do not involve bicameralism.
Nonetheless, bicameralism is a powerful metaphor for thinking through the technical and political implications of I/We, human consciousness, and AI, especially if one considers the theoretical parallels to the dawn of the liberal political recognition that people--not divine rights--constitute political power.
6) The link between federalism and bicameralism would suggest, though not require, the need for a second chamber in federal countries.
Like the Supreme Court, modern and contemporary defenders of bicameralism have nevertheless attempted (with varying degrees of success) to present those democratic deficiencies as strengths: upper houses slow down the legislative process, avoid sudden legislative changes, protect otherwise potentially underrepresented minorities, force legislators to have second thoughts, and so on.
The constitutional provision imposes bicameralism as a way of structuring the Romanian legislative body.
conventional case for bicameralism, separated powers, and a strong
Under the current system of perfect bicameralism, the Senate has virtually equal powers with the lower house but is elected through regional votes rather than a single national ballot.
Hard as it would be to enact legislation, the Framers were not content to rely on the protections of bicameralism and presentment alone.
Thus he despised bicameralism, and rejected checks and balances in constitution-making, not because he had any real insight into how laws should be made, but because he did not.