biceps

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Related to biceps femoris: quadriceps femoris

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that the traditional deadlift presented greater activation of the biceps femoris than BHT was due to the mechanical difference between the two (Andersen et al., 2018).
(a) Identification the internervous plane (I) between the vastus lateralis (V) and biceps femoris (B).
All adult animals, used in this study, were in good health and were randomly divided into 2 groups (sample size was 10 for each group) and treated as follows: i) Control Group: plateau pikas injected with 0.5 mL normal saline in each bilateral biceps femoris of hind legs; ii).
Caption: FIGURE 1: Dissection of right posterior thigh and popliteal fossa to show tensor fasciae suralis muscle (TFS: tensor fasciae suralis muscle; TN: tibial nerve; Gmh: gastrocnemius muscle, medial head; Glh: gastrocnemius muscle, lateral head; AM: adductor magnus muscle; SM: semimembranosus muscle; ST: semitendinosus muscle; BFlh: biceps femoris muscle, long head; BFsh: biceps femoris muscle, short head; VL: vastus lateralis muscle; ITB: iliotibial band).
The integral of the left Biceps Femoris (BF) in the LC was 100.4 [+ or -] 16.1 mV*s and was 130.8 [+ or -] 48.2 mV*s in the right BF (p < 0.05).
The synergies weighting coefficients indicate that the four coactivation patterns are vastus medialis, rectus femoris, and gluteus maximus; gastrocnemius, soleus; tibialis anterior; and biceps femoris, respectively.
Hip abductors Gluteus medius Gluteus minimus Tensor fascia latae Hip adductors Adductor brevis Adductor longus Adductor magnus Gracilis Hip flexors Ileopsoas Rectus femoris Sartorius Hip extensors Bicep femoris long head Gluteus maximus Semimembranosus Semitendinosus Knee extensors Rectus femoris Vastus Intermedius Vastus lateralis Vastus medialis Knee flexors Biceps femoris long head Biceps femoris short head Semimembranosus Semitendinosus TABLE 3: Moment arm range (minimum-maximum) across a physiological range of motion for each of the studied muscle bundles in the model and corresponding published values.
The lateral superior genicular artery is located in a "triangle," consisting of the vastus lateralis anteriorly, the short head of the biceps femoris posteriorly, and the femur condyle inferiorly.
De Vito, "The effectiveness of two novel techniques in establishing the mechanical and contractile responses of biceps femoris," Physiological Measurement, vol.
Incision was given to expose the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles which were reflected caudally and cranially respectively to expose the fractured fragments (Fig.1).