biceps

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Related to biceps femoris: quadriceps femoris

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
References in periodicals archive ?
A previous study on 12 patients positive for anti-SRP antibodies showed that fatty infiltration was most severe in the hamstring and adductor magnus, while edema was most severe in the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and adductor magnus.
sEMG of the latissimus dorsi (LD), tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius lateral head (GL), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were collected bilaterally and wirelessly at 3000 Hz (Trigno Delsys, MA, USA).
There were no significant differences in the results for the biceps femoris muscle (long head) (Table 2).
The mean (lower and upper level of 95% confidence interval) of males and females in three groups of IMPT of flexion and EMG variables of biceps femoris and medial hamstring are described.
Since lifting was assumed to be a relatively symmetrical activity, only the right erector spinae, rectus abdominis, biceps femoris, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius were palpated and electrodes were placed on the belly of these muscles parallel to the muscle fibres where they would provide the strongest electrical signal (Basmajian, 1967).
The extirpation of the fabella was performed using a posterolateral approach between the iliotibial tract and the biceps femoris, confirming the presence of snapping between the femoral component and fabella during knee flexion.
EMG signals of quadriceps femoris and biceps femoris muscles during squat and vertical jump with maximum weight were recorded.
They found that ageing affects the reduction of WHC of the triceps brachii muscles but not of the biceps femoris and longissimus muscles, even though the SF values of the biceps femoris and longissimus muscles are affected by ageing.
Delsys Trigno wireless electromyography (EMG) surface electrodes (Delsys Inc; Boston, Massachusetts) were attached to the TA, rectus femoris (RF), medial gas-trocnemius (MG), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles of the right leg.
The player has this afternoon undergone testing by the medical services of FC Barcelona who have confirmed the biceps femoris muscle injury in his right leg.
Bipolar Ag-AgCl surface electrodes were used for electromyography (EMG) recordings (silver bar electrodes, diameter 10 mm, centre-to-centre distance 20 mm) of the long head of the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris (Data-Log type no.