bichromate


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bichromate

[‚bī′krō‚māt]
(inorganic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Working in Gum Bichromate enables me to become more engaged in the creation of my work.
The solutions used for the determination of COD are: Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), silver sulfate (Ag2SO4), Mohr's salts (iron solution and ammonium (NH4) 2Fe (SO4) 26H2O), bichromate of potassium (K2Cr2O7) and ferroin (FeSO4, 7H2O) as an indicator dye.
The most common allergens noted by him were potassium bichromate (27%), nickel sulfate (26%) followed by fragrance mix and paraben mix.
Photographers have used this gum bichromate technique to lend a painterly aspect to their works since the 19th century.
The method was based on oxidation of substances with potassium bichromate in concentrated sulphuric acid, and subsequent conversion of the bichromate used to its oxygen equivalent and related caloric value.
Most early photomechanical processes, including collotype or Woodbury-type, used the hardening properties of potassium bichromate upon exposure to light in order to create a printable pattern.
Japanese photographers now also turned away from documenting nature and began manipulating prints using gum bichromate and bromoil pigment to achieve soft-focused, pictorial effects.
Using the latest scientific techniques, including fluorine measurement and radiocarbon dating, the team proved that the mandible of Eoanthropus Dawsoni had been deliberately stained with potassium bichromate and the teeth filed down.
Invented in the 1850s, gum bichromate printing was popularized at the end of the 19th century by the Photo-Secessionists, who liked how the images resembled tonal watercolors and charcoal drawings.
The original Osmose patents described a preservative process using sodium fluoride, potassium bichromate, sodium arsenate, and dinitrophenol.
Individual fecal samples were then placed in a 2% solution of potassium bichromate and left at room temperature for 72 hours with free access to air, before being sealed in their respective containers (Kheysin, 1972).
Those compounds include ammonia, ammonium salt4 alkylamine and/or one of their salts, hydroxylamine and/or their salts, hydrogen halide, acetoacetate, malonate, bromosuccinimide, pyridinium bromide, dioxane perbromide, permanganate, bichromate, chromate, selenium dioxide, alkali sulfite or ammonium sulfite, alkali or ammonium hydrogen sulfite or disulfite, or a thio compound and also ozone.