bicipital groove


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bicipital groove

[bī′sip·əd·əl ‚grüv]
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We preferred full-thickness skin graft which is harvested from the bicipital groove. Of course, the size of the defect, the condition of the wound, and the likelihood of recurrence should be considered.
(1) Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may aid in the diagnosis by demonstrating an absence of the long head in the bicipital groove or at its insertion.
The subscapularis tendon is superficial to the lesser tuberosity and medial to the bicipital groove. Note that the hypoechoic appearance of the medial part of the subscapularis tendon is due to the anisotropy.
Caption: Figure 2: Axial DP FS SE MR sequential images of the right shoulder (TR = 2540; TE = 11.18; NEX = 2; EC = 1) demonstrating a shallow bicipital groove (black arrows) and absence of the long head of the biceps tendon.
The initiating point for the inferior takedown is along the medial ridge of the bicipital groove;
Mobilisation of adhesions at posterior shoulder and LH of biceps in the bicipital groove should be included in the rehabilitation process.
The second one (anterior schantz pin) just lateral to bicipital groove, 30[degrees] anterior to the first schantz pin.
A "chondral print" has been noted in patients and thought to be an indirect sign of LHB instability [9], and chondromalacia beside the bicipital groove or the "biceps tendon footprint" has also been attributed to maltracking of the LHB in the setting of rotator cuff tears and instability [10].
The pain is usually localized to the bicipital groove and might radiate toward the insertion of the deltoid muscle.
Incidental finding on MRI was splitting of the long head of the biceps brachii at the bicipital groove and reattachment at lower level close to musculotendinous junction.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) without contrast of the affected shoulder indicated an anterior Bankart type labral lesion, small nonengaging Hill-Sachs lesion, and most atypically nonvisualization of the biceps tendon (Figure 1) and absence of the bicipital groove (Figure 2).
Arthroscopic fixation can be performed to an intact rotator cuff, to the conjoint tendon, just proximal to, or within the bicipital groove. The procedure can also performed in an open sub-pectoral fashion, with a fixation site deep and proximal to the inferior border of the pectoralis major tendon.