bidirectional


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bidirectional

[‚bī·də′rek·shən·əl]
(engineering)
Being directionally responsive to inputs in opposite directions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bidirectional

The ability to move, transfer or transmit in both directions.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of the half-bridge interleaved bidirectional DC-DC converter is proposed and described in [22], [31]-[39].
(i) In this paper, we propose projection and bidirectional projection measures under interval rough neutrosophic environment.
Thirdly, considering the nature of bidirectional pedestrian flow, a modified crossing time model based on the drag force theory is formulated as a function of the number of pedestrians, the directional ratio, and the crosswalk width.
In this mode, the bidirectional switch [S.sub.5] and [S.sub.4] conducts.
Using their bidirectional freezing technique, the Berkeley researchers were able to successfully induce ceramic particles to assemble into scaffolds with centimeter-scale aligned, porous lamellar (alternating layered) structures.
The officials of Vessel Traffic Service Directorate closed the services of transit ships from North to South bidirectional at 01:30 a.m.
three-phase protocol and a two-phase protocol, which form the foundation for future studies on bidirectional communication [1].
Includes an extensive library of PIC elements such as bidirectional waveguides, bidirectional couplers and connectors, light sources such as lasers and VCSELs, modulators, phase shifters and photodiodes such as PINs and APDs.
The use of aggressive tactics in intimate relationships to resolve relationship conflicts has become a critical target of research in the social sciences in recent years, as is evident from the large number of epidemiological studies and scientific publications that have used The Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS; Straus, 1979; Straus, Hamby, Boney-McCoy, & Sugarman, 1996), considering physical aggression as a phenomenon of a dyadic or bidirectional nature (Archer, 2000; Capaldi & Langhinrichsen-Rohling, 2012; Kimmel, 2002; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Selwyn, & Rohling, 2012).