Bikini

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Bikini

(bēkē`nē), atoll, c.2 sq mi (5.2 sq km), W central Pacific, one of the Ralik Chain, Marshall IslandsMarshall Islands,
officially Republic of the Marshall Islands, independent nation (2015 est. pop. 53,000), in the central Pacific. The Marshalls extend over a 700-mi (1,130-km) area and comprise two major groups: the Ratak Chain in the east, and the Ralik Chain in the west, with
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. It comprises 36 islets on a reef 25 mi (40 km) long. After its inhabitants were removed (1946) to Rongerik, Bikini was the scene of 23 U.S. atomic and hydrogen bomb tests (1946–58). The natives were transferred from Rongerik to Ujelang in 1947 and in 1949 were resettled on Kili. Bikini was declared safe for habitation in 1969. In 1974, 100 natives returned, but they were evacuated in 1978 when new data showed high levels of residual radioactivity. A cleanup began in 1988. By the late 1990s, Bikini had become a popular destination for scuba divers, though it remained uninhabited pending completion of the cleanup. Bikini was formerly called Escholtz Island.

Bikini

 

a coral island, or atoll, in the Pacific Ocean, in the archipelago of the Marshall Islands (11°35’ N lat. and 165°25’ E long.). It has been under the guardianship of the USA since 1946. It has an area of about 5 sq km. In July 1946 the USA used Bikini for two atomic bomb tests; on July 1 a high-power bomb was dropped on 73 obsolete warships in the lagoon, and on July 25 an underwater atomic device was exploded in the same location. The atoll was destroyed on Mar. 1, 1954, during tests of the hydrogen bomb.

Bikini

an atoll in the N Pacific; one of the Marshall Islands: site of a US atomic-bomb test in 1946
References in periodicals archive ?
Where Smith argues for a specific definition of the bombshell, one can ascertain again the metaphor of the woman's bikinied body as relocated and displaced bomb.
[15] The bikinied body is indeed a subconscious recognition and displacement of destruction.
In Gojira, a ruined Tokyo takes the place of the bikinied body.
[23] If Japan can be read as a body and Godzilla as a bomb, then the devastated Tokyo becomes the metaphor for domesticating and taming the trauma of the bomb, similar to what I have argued about the bikinied body as a displacement.
Also, within this particular film, the displacement from bomb to bikini does not quite exhibit complete control over the bikinied woman.
Look!" As the moon took away the flesh of its gazers, leaving their faces "Washed white as bone," the bikinied hunchback, "passing, draws their dreams away,/ And leaves them naked to the day." Those bereft of their dreams are "the lovers, one by one," whom she passes on the beach, including "the French lad/ Who exhibitionistically had// Been fondling the American college girl" but now "Loses his interest." In an earlier version of the poem, that he had lost "his erection" (Burt 70ln)makes it all the more clear that in addition (because she emerges from the waves "In Botticellian parody") to being Aphrodite she is also Medusa, or an anti-Medusa who instead of turning men to stone makes them lose their hardness.
A curious but telling detail about the bikinied Medusa is her artificially gold hair: "an old/ Robot pince-nez and hair dyed gold." In the only other instance of gold so far in the sequence, in "Where the Slow Fig's Purple Sloth": The air Is motionless, and the fig, Motionless in that imperial and blunt Languor of glut, swells, and inward The fibers relax like a sigh in that Hot darkness, go soft, the air Is gold.
"Myth on Mediterranean Beach" seems almost a retelling of Promises' "Foreign Shore, Old Woman, Slaughter of Octopus," which is yet another account of seeing an old woman on a Mediterranean beach, even if the woman is not bikinied but dressed in "peasant black." She, too, is "barefoot" and "follows her slow track [...] and does not look back" as the hunchback "turns now to take the lifeward track [...] and does not stop."
"Time/is nothing to the ivy" in the sense that it is infinitely patient and active, its long-term assault on the wall paralleling the "incessant effort" of the cicadas sawing the tree in "What Day Is" and the "incessant" ascent of the surf in "Paul Valery Stood." Time is nothing to the ivy in another sense, that the ivy is just not in Time's realm, like the sea as defined in "Myth on Mediterranean Beach": "that realm where no Time may subsist." The bikinied hunchback goes into that realm when, "moved by memory in the blood," she "Enters that vast indifferency/ Of perfection that we call the sea," and "lingers there/ [...], somnambulist." She becomes one with the vast indifferency of nature.
Yet he bears some resemblance to the bikinied hunchback, that "old/ Robot with pince-nez and hair dyed gold," especially about the eyes.
Slowly the colourful skyscrapers and hotels disappear from view and the sights change to white sheltered bays, dotted with brown bikinied bodies.
And if you aren't intimidated by the lithe bodies of the men or the sleek, bikinied blondes who flock round them, nobody's going to mind if you simply lie back and take in the view.