bilateral

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bilateral

[bī′lad·ə·rəl]
(biology)
Of or relating to both right and left sides of an area, organ, or organism.
(electronics)
Having a voltage current characteristic curve that is symmetrical with respect to the origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asymmetry mediates the outcome of the bilateralism game through its impact on the critical discount factor governing the emergence of global free trade (global free trade emerges below the critical discount factor).
As a result, there is little evidence that significant regionwide intergovernmental collaboration is emerging in Asia (Ravenhill 2010), and bilateralism appears to fill the void of multilateralism.
This can happen only if the notion of bilateralism works with trust at the PoLvl.
The WTO Parliamentary Conference has brought together 250 parliamentarians from across the world to debate world trade issuessuch as bilateralism versus multilateralism with ministers and senior WTO officials and vote an outcome document setting out a political message for government trade negotiators.
The WTO has demonstrated its role that we needed most amid the growing bilateralism and regionalism trading systems nowadays.
A softer, more sympathetic line, a shift away from repeating slogans raised by the human rights industry, a more open appreciation for Rajapaksa's unique feat in becoming the first nation to annihilate an entire internationally listed and banned terror outfit, may produce better results on the devolution from him than simply preaching the 13th Amendment to him and that too by a country like India which advocates bilateralism in settling controversial issues with its neighbors - a principle solidly enunciated in The Indira-Bhutto Shimla Pact.
Competition and Bilateralism in Trade Policy: The Case of Japan's Free TradeAgreements.
theory cannot account for the bilateralism of damages.
Though mostly found in the left testis, bilateralism has been shown in 25% 3 to 39% of cases.
Arguably bilateralism is not an option, and past experience has demonstrated the futility of such methods.
Pastor argues that the status quo--three sets of national policies working at cross-purposes, "dual bilateralism, and a general tendency to fight fires rather than coordinate proactively--is growing more and more dysfunctional.
Schill observes that this convergence is 'surprising' in light of the historic 'failure' of multilateral investment treaties, as well as the greater flexibility offered by bilateralism 'in tailoring international obligations to the specific relationship between the two States' (p 11).

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