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billion

1. one thousand million: it is written as 1 000 000 000 or 109
2. (formerly, in Britain) one million million: it is written as 1 000 000 000 000 or 1012
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Billion

 

(in Russian, usually milliard), a thousand millions; a number represented by the figure 1 followed by nine zeros—that is, the number 109 In certain countries (for example, Germany), a billion is a number equal to 1012.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

billion

[′bil·yən]
(mathematics)
The number 109.
In British usage, the number 1012.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

billion

One thousand millions, or 1 followed by nine zeros (10 to the 9th power). In long scale usage, billion refers to a million millions, or 1 followed by 12 zeros (10 to the 12th power). See space/time and long scale.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
But note that we need a row of 1000 of these square-metre areas to make an area that has 1 square-millimetre as 1 billionth of the total unit-area.
Furthermore, less material is needed to do a cholesterol analysis; only about 50 billionths of a gram gives reliable carbon isotope ratios.
Produced in an accelerator, these antiatoms lasted only 40 billionths of a second before annihilating in collisions with particles of ordinary matter.
The ion beam carves lines as narrow as 150 billionths of a meter.
Van Halbeek says he envisions molecules with these sugar-to-sugar connections tumbling every few billionths of a second but flexing 10 to 100 times as fast.
"Reading" data from a spot involves a similar process but requires sensors to detect light emitted from the colored molecules several billionths of a second after stimulation by lasers tuned to longer wavelengths.
On its fifth try after some new modifications, the machine, called Saturn, blasted out 14 trillion watts of X-ray energy in 40 billionths of a second -- expelling more than 30 times the amount of energy in all the electricity consumed in the United States at that moment.