bimodal distribution


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bimodal distribution

[¦bī·mōd·əl di·strə′byü·shən]
(statistics)
A probability distribution with two different values that are markedly more frequent than neighboring values.

bimodal distribution

see MEASURES OF CENTRAL TENDENCY.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) heuristic over a range of bimodal distributions as well as bell-shaped and positively skewed distributions.
The bimodal distribution at the large population level poses interesting research questions that may be investigated in futre work: Does the majority of the population have near-evenly split fraction of miles between the different modes?
Our data suggested that this is not due to a mix of high-quality and low-quality physicians, which would have been evidenced by a u-shaped or bimodal distribution in physician-specific statin fill rates.
5, 9, and 25-32 micrometers while the other five possessed a bimodal distribution characteristic of the idiopathic stone forming group previously studied and discussed above.
V-PDB] of cheetahs showed also a bimodal distribution that almost matched the bimodal distribution of prey [delta][sup.
To evaluate the persistence of these bimodal distributions, data from 2011 CGL-A were evaluated for bimodal distribution.
This finding is consistent with Diemer's (2009b) finding a bimodal distribution of outcomes relative to the spread in the NFL regular-season games.
Although the data were more limited, a bimodal distribution was seen in one of six censuses for males and one of four for females.
Graphical representation of frequency of age exhibited bimodal distribution where the first peak appears between 20-29 years, both in HL and NHL whereas, in NHL, the second larger peak stuck between 50-59 years.
In English, the vowel pairs were distinguished primarily by a bimodal distribution of spectral cues and secondarily by a bimodal distribution of duration cues.
An apparent bimodal distribution of acetylator phenotype in 96 subjects (27% slow and 73% fast acetylators) was observed from measuring the percentage of acetylation of sulphamethazine in 6 h plasma sample (Huang et al.
For example, the average might be an adequate description for a normal distribution, but might be misleading for a bimodal distribution (shown in Exhibit 2).