binary conversion

binary conversion

[′bīn·ə·rē kən′vər·zhən]
(computer science)
Converting a number written in binary notation to a number system with another base, such as decimal, octal, or hexadecimal.
References in periodicals archive ?
For brain wave data, first apply binary conversion algorithm and waveform reconstruction algorithm in wavelet analysis to process specific brain wave vector data, select specific wavelet generating function, construct an n scale, from 2[sup]0 to 2[sup]n to conduct binary conversion algorithm:
Redundant to binary conversion is given as +1 in clock delay for fair comparison with other implementations.
Therefore, after binary conversion a morphological closing operation was carried out, to close small gaps in the object on the image.
The encoding of operands and results in test vectors for decimal [equivalence] binary conversion logically differs from the encodings described previously.
To this format-independent generalization, which consisted of about 850 vectors, we then added approximately 650 precision-independent vectors for the conversion operators `r', `i', `ri', `ru', `rI', and `rU', and 14,500 precision dependent vectors to test decimal [equivalence] binary conversion (see Section 6 and Paxson and Kahan [1991]).
Whereas no test set for decimal [equivalence] binary conversion is included in Coonen [1984], tables of decimal numbers are available [Tydeman 1996] which require a lot more than 53 bits to achieve correct rounding to double-precision binary representation.
-ieee test decimal [equivalence] binary conversion only within range where IEEE requires exact rounding; this option can be abbreviated to -i To illustrate the applicability of our tool, we have applied it on one hand to several hardware floating-point implementations, including the Intel Pentium processors and SUN Sparc workstations, and on the other hand to the multiprecision software library FMLIB [Smith 1991] and our own IEEE-compliant multiprecision floating-point implementation MpIeee [Cuyt et al.
The same holds for the g++ compiler, except for decimal [equivalence] binary conversion which is only supported in round to nearest.
In this programming environment, erroneous results again only occur in decimal [equivalence] binary conversion, which are the only conversions not implemented in hardware on x87 platforms.
To avoid a large number of decimal to binary conversions, a two-digit stage was used as the basic block for the iterative Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) multiplier.