binary logic


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binary logic

[′bīn·ə·rē ′läj·ik]
(electronics)
An assembly of digital logic elements which operate with two distinct states.

binary logic

Processing based on the binary numbering system. See binary, chip and Boolean logic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dualism is not only the binary logic of mainstream Western thought, but also the logic of war, since dualism breeds rivalry.
As we have seen, binary logic is an extension and amplification of the typographic culture which emerged during the Renaissance and experienced a "dissociation of thought and feeling" (Turkle, p.
To explain the centrality of binary logic to debates about technology in and out of sport, Magdalinski begins her book with an historical analysis of the origins of sport and leisure, arguing that contemporary sport was partially produced as "an antidote to the twin threats of industrialisation and urbanization, which were thought to jeopardise the health and hygiene of not only individuals but of society at large" (p.
In the world of binary logic, both of the opening chapters of Genesis cannot be true; they may, of course, both be false.
account for this intersectionality because it relies on a binary logic
(2.) Fuzzy logic uses the same rules as binary logic, with the exceptions of the Law of the Excluded Middle, and the Law of Contradiction (which exclude the possibility of overlapping sets).
The two radio plays I silenzi parlano fra di loro and Un paesaggio udito attempt this experiment by addressing the audience through a binary logic that was already present in Canguillo's play Luce:
Mohr argues that these texts "incorporate within the dystopian narrative a utopian undercurrent" and that the texts' utopian "strategies criticize, undermine, and transgress the established binary logic of dystopia" (3).
To understand fuzzy logic, you'd need to be a cybernetician or, at the very least, a giant brainbox, but try this: binary logic produces yes/no answers.
The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and 0.
Where others have invoked a binary logic in attempting to assess whether this development is good or bad, Gunkel considers the different question of why so many books on new media explicitly or implicitly address the issue of their materiality.

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