binary optics

binary optics

[′bī·ner·ē ′äp·tiks]
(optics)
A technology that uses etching technology to produce optical elements with computer-generated microscopic surface relief patterns having two or more levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
The design techniques used for binary optics were initially developed by integrated circuit (IC) manufacturers, by using the CAD software [4].
Diffractive surfaces in most of the optical design codes, such as Oslo [5] and ZEMAX [2], are closer approximation to kinoforms than true binary optics, since the phase is continuous everywhere, so the evaluation of the optical performance of that elements will be done for continuous phase profile case [6].
Swanson, Binary Optics Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 1989.
The focus switches to devices in chapters discussing photovoltaic devices, optoelectronic devices, miniature solid-state lasers, optical modulators, optical fibers, ion-exchanged glass waveguides, design methodology for guided-wave photonic devices, optical data storage, holographic data storage, binary optics, and electronic displays.
Papers on optical materials and fabrication will cover laser inorganic nonlinear optical materials and binary optics; films, fibers, and magneto-optics; and polymer materials and integrated optics.