bind


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bind

1. another word for bine
2. Music another word for tie
3. Fencing a pushing movement with the blade made to force one's opponent's sword from one line into another
4. Chess a position in which one player's pawns have a hold on the centre that makes it difficult for the opponent to advance there

BIND

bind

(1) To link, join, connect or associate one element with another as in the following examples.

(2) To link subroutines in a program. Applications are often built with the help of many standard routines or object classes from a library, and large programs may be built as several program modules. Binding puts the pieces together. Symbolic tags are used by the programmer in the program to interface to the routine. At binding time, the tags are converted into actual memory addresses or disk locations. See linker and bindings.

(3) To link any element, tag, identifier or mnemonic with another so that the two are associated in some manner. For example, key bindings link a physical keyboard key to a numeric code that is generated when pressed. See alias and map.

(4) (BIND) (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) The most widely used DNS server software. The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) offers a reference implementation of BIND, which is available at www.isc.org. See DNS.

(5) In a communications network, to establish a software connection between one protocol and another. Data flows from the application to the transport protocol to the network protocol to the data link protocol and then onto the network. Binding the protocols creates the internal pathway. See OSI model.


Binding Protocols in Windows
This Windows Network control panel shows bindings for the network and the modem. The NetBEUI and TCP/IP protocols are bound to the Ethernet adapter data link protocol for a LAN connection, and TCP/IP is also bound to the dial up adapter for Internet connection via modem.
References in periodicals archive ?
"If Lord Krishna can be 'Gwala' and Lord Ram can be 'Kshatriya' by caste, why not Lord Shiva is Bind ?
Zhang et al (1) compiled binding data for 222 drugs, half of which bind 90% to 100%.
Following the option exercise, BIND will receive a USD2.5m option exercise fee from Pfizer.
It appears that although most of the protein binds to the competitor, a substantial fraction is still able to bind to the specific DNA probe.
Tysabri (or natalizumab) binds to an ICAM and blocks its function, thereby stopping activated immune cells from leaving the bloodstream.
When the scientists expose the system to certain vapors, some chemicals bind to the dyes or diffuse into the polymer.
The DBA lectin did not inhibit attachment of recombinant VLPs, which indicates that it does not bind oligosaccharide structures recognized by VLPs and HPA.
The machine takes about three minutes to heat up, and the binding process takes 30 seconds per bind. Covers cost about $1.30 each and you can find them in most office superstores.
Like the THF-diols, this novel endocrine-disruptive agent derived from fatty acid metabolism in plants does not bind to ER or nuclear type II [[sup.3]H]estradiol binding sites and thus antagonizes estrogenic response through nonclassical pathways (Maggiolini et al.
Blueprint assembles and curates known interactions between biological molecules and enters this data into BIND, a repository of biological data ranging from molecular interactions and small-molecule chemical reactions to interfaces from three-dimensional structures, pathways and genetics interaction networks.
If you continue to crank counterclockwise and bind the cable, you'll lose tension on the winch.
In Matthew 16:13-20 the church's authority to bind and loose is grounded in its acclamation of Jesus as the Christ, the Son of the Living God.