Binder

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binder:

see combinecombine
, agricultural machine that performs both harvesting and threshing operations. Although it was not widely used until the 1930s, the combine was in existence as early as 1830.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Binder

Glue used in manufactured wood products, such as medium-density fiberboard (MDF), particleboard, and engineered lumber. Some binders are made with formaldehyde.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Binder

 

a machine for cutting the stalks of grain crops and tying them into sheaves.


Binder

 

any of a group of materials that cause cohesion of grains of silica sand or other fillers used in making foundry molds or cores. The binder ensures the necessary strength of the core or mold. The film of binder applied to the surface of the filler grains is hardened either by heating the mixture or by the action of external agents.

Binders fall into three classes: anhydrous organic binders (linseed oil, drying oil), hydrous organic binders (synthetic resins, sulfite residues [liquor], molasses), and hydrous inorganic binders (molten glass, cement, foundry clay). Binders can also be classified according to the type of hardening as those with irreversible hardening (drying oil, ethyl silicate, synthetic resins), intermediate hardening (sulfite residues [liquor], dextrin), and reversible hardening (rosin, foundry clay).

Binders with irreversible hardening produce mixtures that exhibit a tensile strength when dry of more than 0.5 meganewton per sq m (MN/m2), or 5 kilograms-force per sq cm, assuming 1 percent binder in the mixture. Binders with intermediate hardening produce mixtures with tensile strengths in the range 0.3–0.5 MN/m2, and mixtures made from binders with reversible hardening have strengths up to 0.3 MN/m2.

REFERENCES

Kumanin, I. B., and A. M. Liass. Sviazuiushchie materialy dlia sterzhnei. Moscow, 1949.
Berg, P. P. Formovochnye materialy. Moscow, 1963.

G. V. PROSIANIK

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

binder

[′bīn·dər]
(materials)
A resin or other cementlike material used to hold particles together and provide mechanical strength or to ensure uniform consistency, solidification, or adhesion to a surface coating; typical binders are resin, glue, gum, and casein.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

binder

1. A cementing material, either hydrated cement or a product of cement or lime and reactive siliceous material, for holding loose material together.
2. A component of an adhesive composition that is primarily responsible for the adhesive forces which hold two bodies together.
7. Any member which binds together components of a framing structure.

binding joist, binder

A beam which supports the common joists of a wood floor above and the ceiling joists below; commonly, joins two vertical posts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

binder

1. a tie, beam, or girder, used to support floor joists
2. the nonvolatile component of the organic media in which pigments are dispersed in paint
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Binder

An earlier Microsoft Office workbook file that let users combine related documents from different Office applications. The documents could be viewed, saved, opened, emailed and printed as a group. Binder was an ActiveX Documents container, and Office applications were ActiveX Documents servers. The documents were ActiveX Documents objects, formerly known as DocObjects. Introduced with Office 97, Binder was dropped in Office XP. See ActiveX Documents.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Fire insurance binders were first subjected to a statutory time limitation in New York in 1917.
The permanent deformation characteristics of binders can be quantified by the [j.sub.nr] parameter.
Wei, "Connections between the rheological and chemical properties of long-term aged asphalt binders," Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, vol.
For each dataset, i.e., the pavement structure with its respective resilient modulus for the constituent materials, the values of permissible fatigue solicitations ([N.sub.FATIGUE]) were determined by the performance models of Franco (2007), mentioned above, for each of the three types of asphalt binders.
--Don't buy a binder from Les Love Boat or Les Lesbian.
Census Bureau SOC) Substrate 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Brick 39% 26% 15% 20% 25% Stucco 12% 15% 20% 18% 20% Fiber Cement -- -- 3% 9% 16% Wood 30% 42% 38% 15% 9% Vinyl -- -- 22% 40% 37% Aluminum 14% 8% 5% 2% -- Driven by a rise in new housing starts and its ripple effect on the entire economy, robust demand for exterior architectural coatings is generating renewed interest in a versatile binder chemistry that meets low-VOC targets, offers formulation flexibility, and performs across the broad spectrum of substrates that comprise today's residential new build and repaint markets.
A binder is a contract made in contemplation of the issuance of a formal policy of insurance.
Hans Gorlitzer, who works in the Coatings and Additives Business Unit at Evonik as head of business development in the Crosslinkers Business Line, believes the new technology has even more potential: "We aim to open up access to silane-modified binders for other applications too."
The objective of this study was to evaluate quality (based on the viscoelastic properties) of unmodified and polymer modified bituminous binders produced in Poland by refineries in Plock and Gdansk.