Binding

(redirected from binding quality)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

bind

(1) To link, join, connect or associate one element with another as in the following examples.

(2) To link subroutines in a program. Applications are often built with the help of many standard routines or object classes from a library, and large programs may be built as several program modules. Binding puts the pieces together. Symbolic tags are used by the programmer in the program to interface to the routine. At binding time, the tags are converted into actual memory addresses or disk locations. See linker and bindings.

(3) To link any element, tag, identifier or mnemonic with another so that the two are associated in some manner. For example, key bindings link a physical keyboard key to a numeric code that is generated when pressed. See alias and map.

(4) (BIND) (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) The most widely used DNS server software. The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) offers a reference implementation of BIND, which is available at www.isc.org. See DNS.

(5) In a communications network, to establish a software connection between one protocol and another. Data flows from the application to the transport protocol to the network protocol to the data link protocol and then onto the network. Binding the protocols creates the internal pathway. See OSI model.


Binding Protocols in Windows
This Windows Network control panel shows bindings for the network and the modem. The NetBEUI and TCP/IP protocols are bound to the Ethernet adapter data link protocol for a LAN connection, and TCP/IP is also bound to the dial up adapter for Internet connection via modem.

binding time

(1) In program compilation, the point in time when symbolic references to data are converted into physical machine addresses. See bind.

(2) When a variable is assigned its type (integer, string, etc.) in a programming language. Traditional compilers and assemblers provide early binding and assign types at compilation. Object-oriented languages provide late binding and assign types at runtime when the variable receives a value from the keyboard or other source.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.

Binding

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The central theme of an initiation is the palingenesis, or symbolical death and rebirth. This is a universal theme found in initiation and puberty rites in many civilizations and among primitive peoples alike. In many such rituals the novitiate is, at some point, bound and often also blindfolded. This binding and blinding symbolize the darkness and restriction of the womb prior to birth.

Mystery religions, of which Witchcraft is one, magical orders and secret societies, follow the same general pattern of blindfolding and binding the candidate at or before his or her initial entrance to the temple. There is a challenge and an exchange of passwords, then the proselyte is brought into the circle. At some point the blindfold and cords are removed, signaling the rebirth, and "new knowledge" is imparted.

In Wicca, the form of binding is important. The cord is first tied with a single square (or "reef') knot around the left wrist. The arms are brought together, crossing over one another, behind the Initiate's back, forming the base of a triangle with the back of the head. The cord is then tied again, once, around the upper right wrist. The two ends of the cord are taken up, one on either side of the neck. They are brought around, crossing the front of the neck, then back to be tied in a loose bow, known as a "cable tow," on the side of the neck with the ends of the cord hanging down. A similar binding is found in Freemasonry and in many forms of ritual and ceremonial magic.

Binding is necessary in some forms of Wiccan magic. In the Gardnerian tradition, for example, the High Priestess is bound, as described above, and then kneels before the altar. She is then ritually scourged, to course the blood through her body, which is believed to help generate magical power. She remains bound throughout the working of the magic.

Binding spells are used to prevent someone from divulging secrets, especially Craft or magical secrets. Witches may not perform negative magic, but binding spells are generally viewed as being in a "gray area," in which the person at whom the spell is directed is neither helped nor harmed. Most such binding spells involve the use of a poppet, to represent the subject although they can be done with no more than a photograph or even a brief example of the persons handwriting. If a poppet is used, it may be of wax, cloth, clay, or similar material. The figure is named for the person in a consecration ritual and it is stated that whatever is done to the figure will be done to the person it represents. The poppet is then bound with silk thread of a relevant color and, if necessary, the mouth may be sewed shut. No physical harm comes to the subject, but specific words and/or actions are restricted.

In ceremonial magic a spirit is said to be "bound" when subdued by the use of words and symbols sufficient to prove the superiority of the magician.

See, also, Gray Magic and Knot Magic.

The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism © 2002 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Binding

 

in a narrow sense, the fastening of signatures; in a broad sense, the processes of preparing printed sheets in the production of bound pamphlets, journals, and books.

Binding includes cutting signatures (if this is not done by the printing machine) and folding them. Separately printed illustrations, tables, and so forth are tipped in, inserted, or outlined on the signatures. After this, the unbound book is completed: the signatures are put in proper order by hand or on gathering machines, and gathering-sewing machines. The signatures gathered into unbound books are sewn together with thread or wire on sewing machines or glued (the non-sewing method of fastening), after which the cover is glued on and the book is trimmed on three sides. If the pages are being prepared for hard cover, binding ends after the fastening of the signatures, gluing of the cover, and trimming of the book on three sides. The first continuous binding-covering operation lines in the world for issuing hard-cover books were established in 1949. For processing many printings of pamphlets and journals, high-production assembly lines combining the gathering, sewing, and cutting processes and the stacking, sewing, covering, and trimming processes are used.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To take one concrete example, he advocates the binding quality of the traditional Halakha on matters of personal status.