binomial trials

binomial trials

[bī′nō·mē·əl ′trīlz]
(statistics)
A sequence of trials, each trial offein that a certain result may or may not happen. Also known as Bernoulli experiments; Bernoulli trials.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For each arm, the number of patients who had myocardial infarction out of a total [n.sub.t] is considered to be the number of successes in [n.sub.t] binomial trials. Similarly, the number of cases in the control group is treated as a binomial outcome independent of the treatment group.
The beta-binomial distribution is used to model the number of successes in n binomial trials when the probability of success is p with a beta distribution with parameters a and b.
(Transaction costs-or the bookie's "vigorish"-make the bettor's breakeven rate 52.4 percent.) Twenty-three of those rules were nonrandom at the p < 0.05 level where winning and losing bets constitute binomial trials and the probability of x wins is found by: