binormal

binormal

[bī′nȯr·məl]
(mathematics)
A vector on a curve at a point so that, together with the positive tangent and principal normal, it forms a system of right-handed rectangular cartesian axes.
References in periodicals archive ?
A rectifying curve is a linear combination of the tangent and two binormal vectors.
The Maximum likelihood estimation of a binormal Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve from categorical rating data at 95% confidence interval was calculated (JROCFIT Version 1.
Approximated ROC curves were calculated on the basis of a binormal model to compare the area under the curve (AUC) (16).
The binormal selection curve is the addition of two normal curves with a weighting factor (w) (Santos et al.
They can also import 3D scenes and contents from an existing 3D PDF as well as convert all polygons to triangles of a 3D model, and may also generate tangent and binormal data for all meshes in 3D models.
Here, we assume that the distribution follows binormal Gaussian mixture distribution.
Two desingularization procedures are carried out (including a time renormalization) to obtain an evolution equation (the binormal equation).
In the weld procedure, the direction of oscillation is along the binormal vector [p.
Since the curve [alpha](t) is also in space, there exists Frenet frame {T, N, B} at each points of the curve where T is unit tangent vector, N is principal normal vector and B is binormal vector, respectively.
The pipe diameter changes are evaluated in two directions: first is in the radial direction, second is in the binormal direction.
The second kind is a parametric analysis called the binormal method (Dorfman & Alf, 1968; McClish, 1989).
Analogously, osculating curves in the Minkowski space-time are defined in [6] as the space curves whose position vector (with respect to some chosen origin) always lies in its osculating space, which represents the orthogonal complement of the first binormal or second binormal vector field of the curve.