bioactivity

(redirected from bioactive)
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Related to bioactive: Bioactive glass

bioactivity

[‚bī·ō·ak′tiv·əd·ē]
(biology)
The effect that a substance has on a living organism or tissue after interaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
For each type of bioactive glass, a 25 g of batch was obtained by mixing analytical reagent using a planetary ball mill (SFM-1, QM-3SP2) runs at 300 rpm, for 6 hours, The mixture was then dried at 130 for 24 h, then melted in alumina crucible at 1400 [+ or -] 10 for 3 hours in an electric furnace to guarantee completely melting.
"By joining the Hallstar team, we ensure that access to these natural resources for cosmetic brands can be provided, as bioactive ingredients, on a global scale.
The leaves of the tea plant and tea are rich in bioactive compounds.
"The information about bioactive compounds from marine organisms inhabiting the Arabian Sea and the Sea of Oman is limited.
Bioactive glass contains compounds such as silicon oxide, calcium oxide and phosphorus oxide, and it looks like powdered glass.
Additionally, this intellectual property establishes NovaBone as the only provider of bioactive glass/collagen bone grafting composites where the amount of bone healing glass exceeds 80 percent."
Glanbia's patented process allows purified production of this multi-functional bioactive. While its main function is to transport iron ions to aid in biological processes, clinical research has also shown it has other important functions including antioxidant activity, anti-inflammation, immunity system stimulation, gut health, and bone health.
In addition to having the advantages of other bioactive materials, this material is able to speed up the proliferation and differentiation of bone cells.
Scientists have found that food bioactive compounds have a positive effect on health.
"Based on the strong preliminary studies, we believe that these highly bioactive nanoplatelets may be utilized to develop devices such as injectable tissue repair matrixes, bioactive fillers, or therapeutic agents for stimulating specific cellular responses in bone-related tissue engineering," said Akhilesh Gaharwar, Ph.D., first study author.
UV concentration, degree of ripeness, postharvest storage conditions, and processing, each can significantly alter the amounts of nutrients and bioactive components.
During the last decade, the use of mesoporous materials, which have pores ranging in size from 2 to 50 nm, was proposed in tissue engineering because their large surface area and pore volume may enhance their bioactive behavior and allow them to be loaded with the osteogenic agents used to promote new bone formation [1-4].