bioavailability


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bioavailability

[‚bī·ō·ə‚vāl·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(physiology)
The extent and rate at which a substance, such as a drug, is absorbed into a living system or is made available at the site of physiological activity.
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CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that arsenic bioavailability in rice is highly dependent on arsenic speciation, which in turn can vary depending on rice cultivar, arsenic in irrigation water, and the presence and nature of arsenic speciation in cooking water.
The new delivery platform has been previously shown to be effective also for other drugs, and offers a revolutionary method to bypass specific potent barriers in the intestine and the liver, thereby greatly increasing bioavailability.
For example, take Aceclofenac, which is classified as practically insoluble and has a low oral bioavailability (60-70%) (5).
With these studies, we are excited to solidify the ability of our technology to create the highest bioavailability whey protein, as well as demonstrate the technology's flexibility not just on plant proteins but other food ingredients as well," said Plasma Nutrition's co-founder Steve Motosko.
Drug bioavailability--or absolute bioavailability --refers to the fraction of an administered dose of a drug (unchanged) that reaches the intravascular compartment, i.
The estimated relative bioavailability values obtained with the slope-ratio assay were 31.
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts plan to determine the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of nano-laminated biopolymer coatings and the bioavailability of encapsulated lipids.
havecommenced a comparative bioavailability clinical study comparing RHB-103 to the European reference drug.
Frutarom Switzerland, Health BU Switzerland, in conjunction with Aquanova AG, Darmstadt, Germany, is pleased to announce the results of a recently published human study examining the bioavailability of curcumin across three different oral delivery systems.
The first volume addresses polyphenols in chronic diseases and their mechanisms, discussing polyphenols and health in general, including veterinary medicine and animal health, public health, Islamic medicine, stability and bioavailability, and polyphenols as supplements; polyphenols in obesity and diabetes; the oxidation and antioxidant activities of specific polyphenols, such as chocolate and green tea catechin; direct and indirect antioxidant protection from oxidation, cytoprotective actions, lower iron bioavailability, and galloylation and polymerization; inflammation; bioavailability and effects on metabolism; and clinical medicine and polyphenols, including bone microarchitecture, wound healing, reproductive health, the skin, and hepatoprotective actions.
In present study, control and Zn-biofortified grains were milled to estimate Zn bioavailability in various grain milling fractions and flours of various extraction rates.