bioavailability


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bioavailability

[‚bī·ō·ə‚vāl·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(physiology)
The extent and rate at which a substance, such as a drug, is absorbed into a living system or is made available at the site of physiological activity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The 2020 Global Drug Bioavailability Enhancement Summit will connect industry leaders from both mall molecule and biologics areas to address challenges at the interface between drug discovery and preclinical/clinical development.
First used by a team of scientists at the Regional Research Laboratory in Jammu, India (now the Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, IIIM), the term "bioavailability enhancers" refers to chemical agents (also called bioenhancers) that can be extracted from natural compounds found in a variety of medicinal plants; these bioenhancers work in concert with certain drugs, augmenting their bioavailability without having a specifically therapeutic effect (6-7).
"With these studies, we are excited to solidify the ability of our technology to create the highest bioavailability whey protein, as well as demonstrate the technology's flexibility not just on plant proteins but other food ingredients as well," said Plasma Nutrition's co-founder Steve Motosko.
Drug bioavailability--or absolute bioavailability --refers to the fraction of an administered dose of a drug (unchanged) that reaches the intravascular compartment, i.e., the systemic circulation.
According to the results, the group of GHD children was divided into two subgroups: GHD children with low IGF-I bioavailability (n = 13; IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio below the cutoff level) and with normal IGF-I bioavailability (n =13; IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio equal or higher than the cutoff point).
Indeed, it has been reported that P from plant-based source is of low bioavailability compared to inorganic sources such as MSP (NRC, 1994; 2012).
This research can lead to the creation of delivery systems with controllable lipid bioavailability: fully digestible, fully indigestible or targeted release systems.
Studies have reported differences in RFP bioavailability between products containing RFP alone and FDC products.
The author views erectile dysfunction as a cardiovascular impairment, namely due to an impaired vascular endothelium resulting in reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, and proposes measures to prevent the dysfunction through nutrition.
This innovative technology transforms fat-soluble vitamins into water-soluble ones--dramatically increasing solubility, absorption, and bioavailability.
Little is known about the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of the orange-fleshed melon's carotenoids.
havecommenced a comparative bioavailability clinical study comparing RHB-103 to the European reference drug.