Marker

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marker

[′märk·ər]
(immunology)
Any antigen that serves to distinguish cell types.
(ordnance)
A sign or signal for marking a location on land or water; frequently contains pyrotechnics.

Marker

 

a device for guiding a sower or planter to form interrows of a planned width. A marker consists of an extendable bar connected by a hinge to a sower or hitch. On the outer end of the bar is a disk, which is mounted at an angle and rotates freely; as it moves over the field, it leaves a furrow in the un-seeded area. On the next pass of the unit the furrow is used to guide the right front wheel or the inside edge of the right track of a tractor. Sowers and planters usually operate with right and left markers. The overlap (M) of the marker is determined according to the following formulas:

where a is the distance between the front wheels or the inside edges of the tracks, B is the distance between the extreme colters of the sower, and C is the size of the interrow.


Marker

 

an attachment to a single- or double-row sower that ensures parallel rows of seeds in subsequent passes. A marker consists of a beam with a weight on the end; the beam is secured to the front of the tractor. The tractor is steered so that the weight of the marker is above the track left by the planter wheel or marker disk on the preceding pass. Markers are often made reversible so that they can be used on both sides of the tractor.

marker

A sign, plaque, or monument that designates a building, site of historic importance, or boundary.

marker

markerclick for a larger image
Distance to go markers on the sides of runway.
An object displayed above ground level in order to indicate an obstacle or delineate a boundary (ICAO). Markers should be frangible, and those located near a runway or taxiway should be sufficiently low to ensure clearance for propellers and the engine pods of jet aircraft. The various types of markers are the distance-to-go markers, unpaved runway-edge markers, stop-way-edge markers, taxiway-edge markers, taxiway centerline markers, boundary markers, and unpaved taxiway-edge markers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a controlled clinical trial could be difficult to design and complete, but is essential before clinicians caring for patients with or at risk for osteoporosis will be convinced that biochemical markers of bone turnover must become an integral part of their clinical practice.
Of the routinely available biochemical markers used to assess acute coronary syndromes, myoglobin appears earliest in the blood after myocardial injury.
Biochemical markers of bone turnover are used to predict future bone loss in osteoporotic patients (4, 38, 39).
Secondly, there is a need to conduct multicentric study to determine the median values of these four biochemical markers.
Association of serial biochemical markers with acute ischemic stroke: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant plasminogen activator stroke study.
Biochemical markers and estradiol hormone pre and post test in both groups.
Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the response of bone biochemical markers to a single bout of high-impact exercise.
Biochemical markers (Table 1) linked to the ischemic cascade have the potential to predict outcomes before, during, and after stroke.
Zinc, a mineral closely related to bone metabolism [6], has been proposed as a biochemical marker in osteoporosis [7].
The researchers describe the enzyme alpha (13) L-fucosyltransferase as a promising biochemical marker for patients with ovarian, gastrointestinal and lung cancers, among the most difficult cancers to detect and treat.
The results were analyzed by applying paired "t' test, independent "t" test and ANOVA test for biochemical markers and 'Chi-Square test' for histopathologcal findings.

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