bioconversion


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

bioconversion

[‚bī·o·kən′vər·zhən]
(biophysics)
The process of converting biomass to a source of usable energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
aspellum-2527 can be potential candidates for the solid-state bioconversion of Camellia seed residues into digestible ruminant energy feed.
To make AirCarbon plastic, the company places bioconversion reactors at agricultural digesters, landfills, energy facilities, and water treatment plants; the reactors combine captured carbon with hydrogen and oxygen to create the patented plastic.
'Bioconversion by larvae is one of the most promising processes to deal with the wastes.
The unique bioconversion feature eliminates the need for an additional interventional procedure to retrieve the device.
Additionally, its unique bioconversion feature eliminates the need for an additional interventional procedure to retrieve the device.
She explained that the bioconversion process is done by treating copra meal with microorganisms.
There is a considerable interest in chitinolytic bacteria for efficient bioconversion of chitinaceous waste based on the exploitation of chitinases.
Bioconversion is achieved with the hydrolysis of the filament material allowing the filter arms to retract to the IVC wall, where they are incorporated along with the cylindrical frame, leaving the vessel lumen patent.
After years of R&D, and advances in its fermentation and bioconversion technologies, Bestevia Reb-M was introduced to the industry exclusively from SweeGen, a public company that provides the food industry with stevia leaf sweeteners for use in a variety of food and beverage products.
Trzcinski (who developed a novel process for producing biogas from municipal solid waste and for the treatment of landfill leachate, and as a Senior Research Fellow in the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute continued working on solid waste treatment such as waste activated sludge and wastewater treatment in anaerobic membrane bioreactors) examines the bioconversion of food wastes to energy and the recent developments in ethanol, hydrogen, methane, and biodiesel production from food wastes.