biocorrosion


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biocorrosion

[‚bī·ō·kə′rō·zhən]
(metallurgy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The second section focuses on the mechanism of action, with chapters on stress, friction, and biocorrosion. The final section addresses the diagnosis and treatment of NCCLs and CDH, with chapters on morphologic characteristics of NCCLs; clinical analysis and diagnosis of CDH and NCCLs; nonrestorative protocols including occlusal, chemical, and laser therapies; and restorative protocols, addressing adhesive bonding, material, and technique.
The replacement cost for the pipeline due to biocorrosion was reported to be $250 million dollar per annum [8].
The disinfection or purposeful toxicological effect of the electrosynthesized polymethylolacrylamide under study on microorganisms can be applied as in medicine (e.g., in development of antiseptic materials and implants) as for equipment protection from biopollution and biocorrosion or in other fields of industry.
In particular, V ions released by biocorrosion from metal implants and accumulated in the bone could exert specific effects on bone turnover and more specifically on OC.
Interactions between metals and microbes have been exploited for various biological applications in the fields of bioremediation, biomineralization, bioleaching, and biocorrosion [74].
Haverich, "Biocorrosion of magnesium alloys: a new principle in cardiovascular implant technology?" Heart, vol.
(10.) Madhu Joshi et al., Control of Biocorrosion to Prevent the
The 2013 Applied Chemicals and Materials Division workshop on Alternative Fuels and Materials: Biocorrosion was held to identify and explore the unique materials and chemical challenges that occur with manufacturing, transport, and storage of alternative fuels.