biocytin


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biocytin

[‚bī·ō′sīt·ən]
(biochemistry)
C16H28N4O4S Crystals with a melting point of 241-243°C; obtained from dilute methanol or acetone solutions; characterized by its utilization by Lactobacillus casei and L. delbrückii LD5 as a biotin source, and by its unavailability as a biotin source to L. arabinosus. Also known as biotin complex of yeast.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Victor Nadler," Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and synapse formation after status epilepticus in rats: visualization after retrograde transport of biocytin," Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol.
During whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiological recordings, some neurons were filled with biocytin so their morphology could be recovered.
Zymosan administration 3 days prior to optic nerve injury highly stimulated RGC axonal regeneration, assessed at 7 days after injury via anterograde biocytin tracing as described previously [113, 114].
Biocytin was included in the pipette solution at 0.5-1 mg/ml to retrospectively identify recorded cells.
N-(3-maleimidylpropionyl) biocytin (MPB) was purchased from Invitrogen (USA).
To measure this correlation, sensory neurons were injected with biocytin to label their sprouting after lesioning.
In addition, catabolism of biotin leads to formation of many metabolites such as bisnorbiotin and biocytin. We measured the biotin concentration in the patient's specimen using a microbial growth assay that underestimates biotinylated molecules (11), suggesting that the actual concentration of biotinylated molecules present may be substantially higher than 4.8 [micro]g/L.