biodegradable

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biodegradable

(of sewage constituents, packaging material, etc.) capable of being decomposed by bacteria or other biological means

Biodegradable

Waste material composed primarily of constituent parts that occur naturally, are able to be decomposed by bacteria or fungi, and are absorbed into the ecosystem. Wood, for example, is biodegradable, while plastics are not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even materials like leaves, banana peels or paper--each inherently biodegradable in soil in an aerobic (where oxygen is present) environment--will fail to biodegrade when dumped in a landfill or other anaerobic (lacking oxygen) environment.
Unlike other plastics, including bioplastics, OBP biodegrades anywhere in the environment, and can be recycled if collected during its useful life.
Scientists say that the degradation rate is extremely fast compared with other recent discoveries, such as bacteria reported last year to biodegrade some plastics at a rate of just 0.13 mg a day.
It is designed to penetrate the superficial layers of the skin and dissolve or biodegrade upon application, eliminating bleeding and the discomfort associated with traditional injections.
Importantly there is no difference in shelf life as Green-DEX[TM] does not start to biodegrade until it is in landfill.
"When biomaterials do not biodegrade and remain in skeletal tissue, they may continuously cause problems in the host.
As would be expected, it then eventually proceeds to biodegrade, and will share its carbon with plant life.
As the granules biodegrade, they slowly release the oils, creating time-release, long-lasting, pleasantly scented and guaranteed-effective repellency.
Cigarette butts are often discarded adjacent to a dedicated receptacle, while chewing gum does not biodegrade, and disfigures the pavements.
Cigarette butts are often discarded adjacent to a dedicated receptacle and chewing gum does not biodegrade and disfigures the pavements.
This alternative insulating material also represents up to an 80% reduction in greenhouse gases and a 70% decrease in energy requirements from polystyrene, reducing the amount of time required to biodegrade in a landfill.
The problem with these bags is that they biodegrade in the sun, yet are likely to be buried in the ground, so how is that better?