bioelectricity

(redirected from bioelectric)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to bioelectric: bioelectric potential

bioelectricity

[¦bī·ō‚i‚lek′tris·əd·ē]
(physiology)
The generation by and flow of an electric current in living tissue.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Davis MP Bioelectric impedance phase angle changes during hydration and prognosis in advanced cancer.
VATEL: 757-683-2796Contact: Kendra BriscoeTEL: 757-683-2802 Bid Pkg Source: Center for Bioelectric Research, Norfolk Public Health BuildingAddress: 830 Southampton Avenue City: NorfolkState: VATEL: 757-683-2796Conta
On the seventh postoperative day, we attached electrodes to the quadriceps muscle again to detect the bioelectric potential along the long axis of the rectus femoris muscle belly (Figure 4(a)).
Bioelectric therapy is believed to work by correcting this abnormal firing of circuits.
Although the main goal of clinical doctors and practitioners is to apply the fastest and easiest methods such as bioelectric impedance analysis, most of the studies emphasize its uncertainties and recommend the mandatory control of measurement condition in order to improve the accuracy of results.
The design stages are related to: mechanical design of the prototype or framework, the design of bioinstrumentation system, developing software platforms for the acquisition of bioelectric signals and actuator control devices as well as the development of the system controlling the power for the exoskeleton's operation (Aguirre and Colgate, 2010; Cenciarini and Dollar, 2011; Wege and Zimmermann, 2007).
In industrial cultures, most people have minimal contract with this natural bioelectric environment in which humans evolved.
The bioelectric signal was amplified (gain 20, 000), filtered (band-pass, 1-100 Hz), and 150 events free from artefacts were averaged for every trial.
Other authors subsequently confirmed bioelectric theory, stating that the epithelium of nasal polyps has the capacity to extend reabsorption of [Na.
These trials typically employ a stimulus generator to create a dipole electric field in seawater that replicates the DC component of the bioelectric field of potential prey items.