bioerosion


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bioerosion

[‚bī·ō·i′rōzh·ən]
(oceanography)
The process by which animals, through drilling, grazing, and burrowing, erode hard substances such as rocks and coral reefs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rate at which pots become incapacitated can be affected by their rate of decomposition, bioerosion, and engulfment through encrustation by sessile organisms.
The limestone marl substrate used to build these reefs became colonized by boring sponge to the degree that bioerosion by sponge potentially compromised the suitability of the reefs for oysters.
The method is also well adapted to phosphocalcic or polymer bone substitutes and can be used to follow their bioerosion and their osteoconduction properties (Ruhe et al.
Polymer bioerosion can be defined as the conversion of a material that is insoluble in water into one that is water-soluble.
Bioerosion of concrete and limestone by marine organisms: A 13 year experiment from Jamaica.
It is possible that an originally extensive site has been largely lost by water, wind and bioerosion, but as the distribution of flaked chert in deflated dune swales along the foredune correlates closely with the location of the present prehistoric deposits, it is more probable that prehistoric occupation was limited and brief.
These polymers are designed for placement at a suitable body site where they undergo a controlled bioerosion process.
Mortality is most often the result of smothering by sediments and by bioerosion of the substrata which leads to toppling of colonies.
DSM's innovative, biocompatible drug carrier changes the way active compounds are delivered locally to the body via unique enzyme-mediated bioerosion.
KEY WORDS: oyster, Crassostrea virginica, restoration, bioerosion, clionid sponge, salinity, recruitment, growth
Experimental studies on microbial bioerosion at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas and One Tree Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia: implications for paleontological reconstructions.