biogenic


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Related to biogenic: sociogenic, Biogenic amines

biogenic

[¦bī·ō¦jen·ik]
(biology)
Essential to the maintenance of life.
Produced by actions of living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ozogul, "Biogenic amines formation in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) stored under modified atmosphere packaging using a rapid HPLC method," International Journal of Food Science and Technology, vol.
In this clean environment, the contribution of biogenic emissions and subsequent increases in secondary aerosol number (e.g., Kulmala et al.
The morphological features of these biogenic structures may also serve as refugia for different life stages of commercially harvested species of Sebastes (Freese and Wing, 2003; Rooper and Boldt, 2005; Baillon et al., 2012) and Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) (Rand and Lowe, 2011) in Alaska waters.
The most common biogenic amines found in foods are histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, sperm idi ne, putrescine, tryptamine, and agmatine.
In some organic horizons, this phase was exceeded by Si from the biogenic amorphous phase.
Although the regulatory limits of biogenic amines have not yet been established by the Organisation Internationale de la Vigne et du Vin (OIV), some countries have established maximum limits for histamine content in wine (from 2 mg [L.sup.-1] in Germany to 10 mg [L.sup.-1] in Switzerland) (MARQUES et al., 2008).
James Mennell, Chief Executive Officer of Biogenic Reagents, said, "This collaboration is expected to provide a strong platform and path for the expansion of renewable biocarbon production capacity with abundant and diversified feedstock supply chain security." Biogenic Reagents Ventures will own and operate an existing biocarbon production facility located in Marquette, Michigan and plans to expand North American production of proprietary biomass-based biocarbon products.
Screening of biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from grape must and wine.
Hammond and Peirce produced biogenic silica from rice hulls and rice straw for use as an anti-caking agent, excipient, or flavor carrier.