biogeochemical cycle


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biogeochemical cycle

[‚bī·ō‚jē·ō′kem·ə·kəl ′sīkəl]
(geochemistry)
The chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies showed that bamboos are a significant organic silicon pool and play an important role in biogeochemical cycles of silicon and other nutrients because of their special growth habit and biogeochemical characteristics, i.e., rapid biomass accumulation, the extremely high biomass of fine roots, and the extremely high silicon content (Christanty et al., 1997; Mailly et al., 1997; Li et al., 2006; Ding et al., 2008).
Consequently less and less life space remains outside the economy to provide the vital function of carrying out the biogeochemical cycles at the rates and through the pathways to which we are adapted (see fig.
We are updated on environmental law, human health issues, and movement of contaminants in biogeochemical cycles. Readers are given access to new and important data, often from government reports.
Stiefel (Princeton U.), and Joan Selverstone Valentine (UCLA), call upon world leaders in the field to provide overviews of biological inorganic chemistry, covering bioinorganic chemistry and the biogeochemical cycles, the behavior of metal ions and proteins, special cofactors and metal clusters, transport and storage of metal ions in biology, biomineralization, and metals in medicine.
Part of a series that links coordination chemistry with biochemistry in the growing field of "bioinorganic chemistry," this volume is devoted to the biogeochemical cycles of elements.
His findings, the committee said, sparked research on "global biogeochemical cycles" as well as the effects on the stratosphere of nitrogen oxide--spewing supersonic transport planes.
That's enough dust to fill four baseball stadiums to the top row of seats, says Gillette, who will describe dust sources in an upcoming GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES.