biological anthropology


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Related to biological anthropology: physical anthropology, Forensic anthropology

biological anthropology

[‚bī·ə¦läj·i·kəl ‚an·thrə′päl·ə·jē]
(anthropology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Interestingly, faculty ranked a hard science background as slightly more important than a biological anthropology background (see Table 4).
These criticisms met with numerous rebuttals (e.g., Buikstra and Konigsberg 1985; Van Gerven and Armelagos 1983) but spurred efforts to address the concerns in both archaeology (see Parker Pearson 1999) and biological anthropology. Improvements to existing techniques of age estimation (e.g., Brooks and Suchey 1990), development of new techniques (e.g., using the auricular surface [Lovejoy et al.
In some countries, that "struggle" pitted ethnology against social anthropology (the Czech Republic, Slovenia), in others, it was more a struggle between ethnology and biological anthropology (Croatia).
Education: M.H.S., Ph.D., epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University; A.B., biological anthropology, Harvard University
My biological anthropology brain got me thinking of how this 1,200-sq-m lot represents what we call an "ecotone," an area that straddles two different ecological zones.
The main courses offered in the field include biological anthropology, social and cultural anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic anthropology.
She manages to squeeze in time to volunteer in the DMV office each week despite pursuing a major in biological anthropology and minors in history and classics.
Although designed to impart a more general knowledge of the form and phylogeny of teeth that will allow undergraduates and graduate students to segue into more specific research topics on this subject, the depth of coverage and inclusion of detailed information (including many primary citations) on all mammalian groups also makes this an important resource for more seasoned experts in organismal biology, paleontology and biological anthropology. Given the inherently visual nature of the subject matter, the book appropriately includes a considerable number of illustrations.
The author, a professor of biological anthropology at Harvard University since 1989, was born in Britain in 1948.
She quickly developed a fascination for biological anthropology: in what ancient skeletons can tell us about human evolution, the diversity of the human species, and about diseases.
The next section, "The First Thule," deals with the nature, timing, and causes of the expansion of the Thule culture from Alaska into the Canadian Arctic and Greenland, exploring various issues from the perspectives of biological anthropology, archaeology, and technology.

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