fitness

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Related to biological fitness: Darwinian fitness

fitness

[′fit·nəs]
(genetics)
A measure of reproductive success for a genotype, based on the average number of surviving progeny of this genotype as compared to the average number of other, competing genotypes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fitness tracker

A wrist-worn device that can detect some combination of walking steps, running distance, heart rate, sleep patterns and swimming laps. Fitness bands interact via Bluetooth with an app in a mobile device that configures the device and downloads the wearer's activity data. Most smartwatches support some number of physical actions via a health app; however, dedicated trackers tend to monitor more functions. See smartwatch.


The Fitbit Surge
The Surge tracks everything including steps, distance, calories and stairs climbed, and it notifies the wearer when a call or text comes in. (Image courtesy of Fitbit Inc., www.fitbit.com)







Withings Activite
This stylish Swiss-made watch from Withings sends steps, laps, run time and sleep patterns to the user's smartphone. A gentle vibration provides a wake-up alarm. (Image courtesy of Withings S.A., www.withings.com)







A Lot of Trackers
In 2015, Under Armour debuted UA Record, an app that pairs with all these brands and imports the data from the user's accounts. UA Record is an evolution of the MapMyFitness platform, which Under Armour acquired in 2013.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The percentage of inhibition is a parameter that has been evaluated in several studies as a variable to characterize the biological fitness of antagonists against the pathogen (13,23,24).
"The viability of the resulting bacterial mats, that is, their biological fitness, improved under both scenarios, provided we allowed mats to compete with each other," explains Katrin Hammerschmidt of the New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study.
Davydovsky on pathology, physiology and biological fitness of the organism for adaptation, ecology and environmental fitness of the functional systems involved in the process of adaptation.