biological invasion

biological invasion

[‚bi·ə¦läj·i·kəl in′vā·zhən]
(ecology)
The process by which species (or genetically distinct populations), with no historical record in an area, breach biogeographic barriers and extend their range.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Biological invasion by Myrica faya in Hawaii: plant demography, nitrogen fixation and ecosystem effects.
A fundamental characteristic of any biological invasion is the speed at which the geographic range of the population expands.
They hope their findings will lead to governments and NGOs improving schemes to warn communities of the threats of biological invasion and provide solutions.
In Out of Eden, journalist Alan Burdick examines these questions in the process of studying several cases of biological invasion.
KEY WORDS: veined rapa whelk, Rapana venosa, range extension, Chesapeake Bay, salinity tolerance, Tangier Sound, James River, Cape Henry, biological invasion
Biological invasion by Myrica faya in Hawaii; Plant demography, nitrogen fixation, ecosystem effects.
Biological invasion by Myrica faya alters ecosystem development in Hawaii.
2010: Biological invasion of European tomato crops by Tuta absoluta: ecology, geographic expansion and prospects for biological control.
The project provides an important tool for managing the threat of biological invasion in Europe.
cd duplication release program for education and environmental disclosure on biological invasion and biodiversity conservation in magallanes, attached rules
tuberculata was recorded in Brazil, few studies have assessed its geographical distribution, infection status and ecology, which all are considered important topics in biological invasion studies (Thiengo et al.

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