biomathematics

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biomathematics

[‚bī·ō‚math·ə′mad·iks]
(biophysics)
Mathematical methods applied to the study of living organisms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We have previously developed an amyloid biomathematical screening methodology to support the screening of candidate amyloid radiotracers during compound development [4, 5].
Cronin, Biomathematical model of aneurysm of the circle of willis: A quantitative Analisys of the differential equation of Austin.
Our biomathematical model for glioma kinetics is able to quantitatively describe its spatial and temporal evolution in terms of the net rates of proliferation and invasion of the glioma cells in individual patients.
For instance, many of the biomathematical tools already developed are more amenable for use in the empirical clarification of design rather than descent, regardless of the original intention of the inventors of those tools.
A biomathematical model of particle clearance and retention in the lungs of coal miners.
A biomathematical model for prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis.
Finally, Kirkwood indicated a role for biomathematical models in deriving testable predictions from the various molecular hypotheses.
Thiriet, Biomathematical and Biomechanical Modeling of the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2014.
The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture.
Before moving to Boston he was professor and chair of Biomathematical Sciences at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (1987-1990), director of the Department of Energy's Health and Environmental Research Programs (1985-1987), and chief of Theoretical Immunology and Mathematical Biology at the National Institutes of Health.
This technique was first used in sleep research to overcome a shortcoming of biomathematical models of fatigue and performance.