biomedicine


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biomedicine

1. the medical study of the effects of unusual environmental stress on human beings, esp in connection with space travel
2. the study of herbal remedies

biomedicine

[‚bī·ō′med·ə·sən]
(medicine)
The science concerned with the study of the environment required for astronauts in space vehicles.
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The Nature Medicine publication outlines the discovery process led by H3 Biomedicine scientists to create and characterize a highly potent, selective, oral, first-in-class modulator of the SF3b complex to target cancer cells with mutations in RNA splicing factor genes.
Impact Biomedicines is currently engaged in the development of fedratinib for the treatment of patients with myelofibrosis (MF) and polycythemia vera (PV).
On April 7, 2015, Seeking Alpha published a report by contributor Pump Stopper on Cellular Biomedicine Group, which asserts that:
Biomedicine and will continue to make contributions by delivering highly efficacious, innovative treatments to patients living with cancer worldwide.
The Nagoya-based trading firm is projecting domestic sales of 500 million yen in the biomedicine business in fiscal 2014 through March 2015.
I feel that our future credibility as healthcare practitioners lies not in cuddling up to biomedicine, but in developing excellence in doing what we do best, that being:
Last month the French Agency for Biomedicine approved applications by five research teams to import and begin research on embryonic stem cells created outside France.
Hindawi now produces 37 open source and subscription journals, including such titles as "Journal of Biomedicine," "Fixed Point Theory and Applications," "Advances in Difference Equations" and "Experimental Diabetes Research.
During our recent experience in conceptualizing and creating a new Office of Translational Biomedicine at the NIEHS, we have learned that the answer, often, is "quite a lot," and perhaps necessarily so.
In the book, Energy Biomedicine, the author shows us how scientists from different spheres of human knowledge--biophysics, biochemistry and biology--are beginning to provide evidence that biotherapists can influence model systems.
Her book is a critical analysis of empire as much as of biomedicine, with the two closely intertwined.
As noted in Nature's online news service and described in an upcoming Reproductive BioMedicine Online, two narrow conduits in the device merge into a broader channel a few human hairs wide.