bioprinting

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bioprinting

Using a specialized 3D printer to create human tissue. Instead of depositing liquid plastic or metal powder to build objects, the bioprinter deposits living cells layer by layer. Although decades away, the goal is to replace donor organs and their ongoing rejection issue with organs 3D printed from a patient's own cells. In the meantime, being able to routinely print tissue that can replace damaged areas in an organ is expected to materialize on a large scale. See tissue engineering.

Early Results
In 2002, Professor Makoto Nakamura of the University of Toyama, Japan determined that human cells were the same size as the ink droplets in an inkjet printer. In 2008, using a modified inkjet printer, Nakamura created a double-walled tube similar to a human blood vessel. In 2013 Cornell University printed ear cartilage that, after implantation, is expected to grow like normal tissue. Also in 2013, San Diego, CA-based Oragnovo printed tiny human liver samples. When subjected to diseases and drugs, the samples behave more like real organs than the commonly used 2D cultures and can determine a drug's efficacy before engaging in clinical trials. See organ on a chip and 3D printing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A functional heart valve that a team of US scientists built out of collagen using a 3D bioprinter, a breakthrough they say could one day create entire organs (Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering/AFP / HO / MANILA BULLETIN)
The plans to deliver the bioprinter's first copy failed after the aborted launch of the Soyuz-FG booster from the Baikonur spaceport on October 11.
Differently from previous studies whereby spheroids were manually assembled into 3D clinically relevant constructs using cylindrical molds [76, 77], in the "Kenzan Method," a 3D bioprinter is used to robotically place cell spheroids in microneedles, which are used as a temporary support during the fusion of spheroids.
praising their company's desktop bioprinter for expanding
BIOLIFE4D is currently developing a technology, a bioprinter, that would allow medical professionals and scientists to 3D print a human heart, which can then be transplanted to a patient who is in dire need of help.
With its exclusive research partnership with Poietis, L'Oreal will seek to create a follicle --the small organ that produces hair--using a bioprinter. The collaboration offers exciting possibilities at a time when conventional tissue engineering technologies remain limited in terms of the complexity of cell patterns, the companies say.
According to the company, this new bioprinter offers new functionality and greater user-friendliness, the printer targets the advanced corporate and research users.
A Makerbot Replicator 2x designed to print plastic was modified into a bioprinter in January 2015 to print tracheal cartilage and again in October 2015 to print soft tissues [15, 16].
The r3bEL 3D bioprinter was introduced early this year and has been adopted by select schools across the country.
Biology company Organovo Holdings (NYSE MKT:ONVO) announced on Monday that it has entered into an agreement to develop 3D bioprinted tissues for skeletal disease research in collaboration with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) under the Methuselah Foundation's ongoing University 3D Bioprinter Programme.
The bioprinter breakthrough has shown promise with cartilage, bone and muscle, opening the prospect of creating replacement human body parts, RT reported.
2, to fabricate 3D hierarchical composite scaffolds, two processes were combined: a 3D bioprinter connected to a three-axis robot system was used to draw the mixture of gelatin and SA hydrogel and a multinozzle electrospinning system installed in another z-axis was used to electrospinning biopolymers loading of multiple drugs.