psychobiology

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psychobiology

[¦sī·kō·bī′äl·ə·jē]
(psychology)
The school of psychiatry and psychology in which the individual is considered as the sum of his environment as well as being considered a physical organism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By demonstrating the interdependence of morphology and syntax, given the already-established interdependence of morphology and phonology (and of phonology and biopsychology), one can ultimately defend the grounding of syntax, too, in biopsychology.
We all know of the proliferation of such hybrid fields as astrobiology, biophysics, biopsychology, molecular genetics, and sociobiology where innovation has emerged from the interstices, across differing perspectives, disciplines, and technologies.
Ethnic Studies, American Civilization, Journalism, Communications, Health Fields, Vocational Fields, Law/Pre-Law, Liberal Studies, Environmental Studies, Biopsychology, Leisure Studies.
a sort of expanded de facto visceral biopsychology, in which the biology
(5) Cognitive and Experimental Psychology: Perception, memory and attention; Decision making and problem-solving; Concept formation, reasoning and judgment; Language processing; Learning skills and education; Cognitive Neuroscience; Computer analogies and information processing (Artificial Intelligence and computer simulations); Social and cultural factors in the cognitive approach; Experimental methods, research and statistics; and Biopsychology. (6) Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytical Psychotherapy: Psychoanalysis and psychology; The unconscious; The Oedipus complex; Psychoanalysis of children; Pathological mourning; Addictive personalities; Borderline organizations; Narcissistic personalities; Anxiety and phobias; Psychosis.
[27] Coscina, D.V., The biopsychology of impulsivity: focus on brain serotonin.
Victor Strandberg describes Faulkner's "biopsychology of sex" being "expressed through animal imagery," which equates "married men with domesticated animals like dogs or mules (Anse Bundren or Vernon Tull), and Superior Males with wild or imperfectly tamed horses (Jewel Bundren, Thomas Sutpen)" (29).
Sufka teaches several courses at UM, including General Psychology, Biopsychology, Psychopharmacology lab, Physiological Psychology and Teaching of Psychology seminar.
William Struthers moves beyond the typical lecture-discussion format of many biopsychology courses to describe additional teaching strategies that engage students around three integrative themes--embodi-ment, emergent agency, and enhancement.
Each student is required to prepare and deliver a training session to the medical residents on a behavioral health topic of mutual interest, such as the biopsychology of trauma, body image and adolescence, and a primer on mood disorders.
She focuses on biopsychology, with particular interests in gender and sexuality, food, emotions, and moral judgment.
Much of her professional scholarship has addressed the historiography of behavior analysis in relation to other disciplines, especially biopsychology. Her mentors have included Ed Morris, Paul Chance, Richard Shull, and Matthew Norman.